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Rugby Roads

One of the commonest questions we, as a group, are asked is about the origins of road names in Rugby. Enquiries to Rugby Borough Council have not been successful, although there seems to have been an attempt by Rugby Museum to make a collection.

Therefore we are starting a list here.

We don't have many names yet, but hope we will be able to add more information in the future.
If you have information about road naming in Rugby, please let us know.
If you want to know about a certain road name, we will try to help.

  

Road Name

Area

 Date

Grid Ref.

Person/ Place

Reason

Notes

Abbey Street

off Murray Road

1893

SP 511758

It is reputed that the street was named after George Abbey (1848- 1938)

In the 1880s he was the owner of a "hansom cab" which he used to collect people from the railway station.

Family members say that he had stables in Abbey Street. In the 1880s he was living in Spring Street and was described as a cab driver and beer retailer. By 1901 he was the landlord of the 'Woolpack' in Lower Street, Hillmorton.

Acacia Grove

off Lancaster Road

c1914

SP 503758

 

It is said to have been so named because the pavement was originally lined with Acacia trees

See also Maple, Poplar & Sycamore Groves

Addison Road

Between Bilton Road, Bilton, and Lawford Road, New Bilton.

1880s

SP 491753

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Essayist, poet and politician. Addison owned the manor of Bilton and resided in Bilton Hall from 1711 to 1719. In 1716, he married Charlotte (1680 -1731), the widow of Richard, 6th Earl of Warwick.

See also Steele Street.

A memorial statue of Addison is in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

Prior to 1954 the part of the present day Addison Road between Bilton Road and Sow Brook was named as Campbell Road and the hill section from Sow Brook to the cemetery entrance was known as Croop Hill.

Campbell Road was presumably named after James Archibald Campbell (1807 - 1879), see Campbell Street, New Bilton.

Albert Street

Town Centre, off Church Street

1851

SP 505752

Albert Joseph Richardson (1811 - 68)

His mother, Mrs Anne Richardson (1791 - 1861) owned the land on which Albert Street was made.

Mrs Richardson inherited considerable land in 1828 when her husband, James Richardson, died.  Albert Joseph was her oldest son. See also James Street.

Alexandra Road

off Wood Street

1904

SP 507758

Alexandra of Denmark (1844 - 1925)

She was the wife of the then reigning British monarch, King Edward VII (1901 - 10)

(see also King Edward Road)

She married Edward, Prince of Wales, in 1863. Their coronation was in 1902.

Alfred Green Close

off Dunchurch Road

1978

SP 501744

Alfred Thomas Green (1918 - 76)

Alderman & Mayor of Rugby Borough Council (1968 - 69)

He was also a Borough councillor (1958 - 76) and an estate agent in the Town.

Anderson Avenue

Rokeby Estate, off Kingsway

1939

SP 501740

Anne Rose Anderson, née Wood, (1852 – 1940).

She was the niece of Richard Henry Wood. She married William Henry Anderson (1846 – 1911) in 1885.

She inherited Rokeby House in 1908 from Richard Henry Wood.

Rokeby Estate was built on part of the former farm estate attached to Rokeby House

Anson Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Frobisher Road

1960s

SP 483747

George Anson, 1st Baron Anson, (1697 - 1762)

Admiral, RN (1746 - 61)

Anson circumnavigated the world (1740 - 44) & captured the Manila Spanish treasure galleon. Was 1st Lord of the Admiralty (1751 – 62).

Arnold Street

Town Centre, off Railway Terrace

1874

SP 507754

Dr Thomas Arnold DD (1795 - 1842)

Headmaster, Rugby School (1828 - 42)

Dr Arnold was famous forreforming the way the School was run, & turning its fortunes around.

Badby Leys

off Orson Leys

 

SP 499732

Badby village, near Daventry, Northants

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Barby Road

off Hillmorton Road

see Notes column

SP 504749

Barby, Northampton-shire

It was the historic route between Rugby and Barby, known as the Barby road.

It probably started out as a bridle way. It was known as Watergate Street from the mid 18th cen to 1891 when it received its present name.

Barrington Road

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Frobisher Road

1960s

SP 481745

Samuel Barrington (1729 - 1800)

Admiral, RN (1787 – 90).

Apart from five years following the Treaty of Paris in 1763, most of his fifty year naval career from 1740 to 1790 was spent at sea.

A portrait of Barrington by Sir Joshua Reynolds can be seen at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich.

Barton Road

Bilton, off Overslade Lane

1956

SP 490735

Clement Mervyn Barton (1885 - 1952)

Clement Barton resided at Red Lodge, Overslade Lane and owned the land on which Barton Road was built.

He was a former Army Captain and veterinary surgeon who, after WW1, devoted his life to breeding racehorses.

Bath Street

Town Centre, off Clifton Road

see Notes column

SP 507751

It was originally a narrow country lane, known as Bath Lane.

The lane is said to have been named from being the route taken by boys from Rugby School on their way to popular bathing places in the River Avon.

The lane was familiarly known as Pigstye Lane from the pig-houses on its eastern side at the town end.

It became a residential street from 1878

Beaconsfield Avenue

St Maries Estate, Off Churchill Road

1958

SP 502744

Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, KG PC FSA (1804 – 81)

He was a British politician and writer. During his parliamentary career from 1837 to 1876, he held many political offices that included twice serving as Prime Minister. Following his enoblement in 1876, he was Leader of the House of Lords until his death.

As he was enobled late in life, he is better known as Disraeli.

Amongst his writings were 16 novels and several political non-fiction works including a political biography, the Life of Lord George Bentinck,

Beatty Drive

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Blackwood Avenue

1957

SP 486745

David Richard Beatty, 1st Earl Beatty, (1871 - 1936)

Admiral of the Fleet, RN (1919 - 27). He became 1st Sea Lord in 1919.

He was well known to residents of the town and district as he frequently visited “The Moat” in Church Street, Rugby, the home of his father, Captain David Longfield Beatty, whilst on holiday from the Navy.

He was buried in St Paul’s Cathedral, London.

Belmont Road

Rokeby Estate, off Kingsway

1938

SP 501740

Belmont House, Sidmouth, Devon.

 

Richard Henry Wood (1820 – 1908), moved from Rugby to Belmont House in 1895 in order to take advantage of its mild climate. On his retirement in 1874 from a Manchester business career, Mr Wood lived in Rugby until his removal to Devon.

(See also the Biographies section of this website.)

Richard Henry Wood’s generosity helped to provide the town of Rugby with the Hospital of St Cross and a public library in St Matthews Street.

Rokeby Estate was built on part of the former Rokeby Farm estate that he had owned.

 

Beswick Gardens

Bilton, off Bawnmore Road

1964

SP 487734

Joseph William Beswick (1888 - 1963)

Mayor of Rugby (1942-43); he was a member of the Rugby Urban District Council and its successor, the Rugby Borough Council, from 1925 until 1947.

By occupation, he was an engineer at the BTH in Rugby (1920 - 52). He was an active member of the Rotary Club in Rugby.

Biart Place

off Clifton Road

1967

SP 516755

Douglas Edgar Biart (1894 - 1986)

Clerk to Rugby UDC (1928 - 32) & and its successor, the Rugby Borough Council (1932 - 54).

When he retired he was made an honorary freeman of the town.

A highlight of his career was his successful presentation in 1932 of the petition by Rugby UDC to a Privy Council enquiry for a Charter of Incorporation as a Municipal Borough.

Bilton Road

Town Centre, off Corporation Street

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 500750

Bilton Village

It was the historic route from Rugby to Bilton & onward to the County town of Warwick. It was part of the Rugby & Warwick Turnpike (1818 -78).

In the mid 18th cen. that part of Bilton Road running south west from its junction with Lawford Road to Oakfield (a large residence/preparatory school) was known as Warwick Street.

Blackwood Avenue

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Addison Road

1958

SP 488745

Sir Henry Blackwood KCB, (1770 - 1832)

Vice-Admiral, RN (1825 - 32)

Captain of frigate Euryalus at Trafalgar, 1805.

There is a memorial tablet for him in the west aisle of the north transept of Westminster Cathedral.

Blake Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cunningham Way

1960s

SP 482745

Sir Geoffrey Blake KCB, (1882 - 1968)

Vice-Admiral, RN (1935 - 38)

In 1938 he retired early from active service due to ill health.

Bloxam Gardens

off Bilton Road

1938

SP 496748

Matthew Holbeche Bloxam (1805 - 88) - see also Biographies section of this website.

A local antiquarian & solicitor (1827 - 88).

Until about 1990 the spelling on the street sign was ‘Bloxham’.

Lived in Rugby for all his life. He was an elected member of the Local Board of Health (1855 – 64) and was clerk to the Rugby Petty Sessions (1831 – 71)

Bloxam Place

off Warwick Street

1934

SP 501750

Matthew Holbeche Bloxam (1805 - 88) - see also Biographies section of this website.

A local antiquarian & solicitor (1827 - 88)

Prior to 1934, Bloxam Place was a private, un-named road from 1842 adjoining Bloxam's house in St Matthews Street.

Bond Street

New Bilton, off Bridget Street

 (see also Reason column)

SP 496754

The reason behind this street name is not known.

Prior to 1949 it was named Bull Street after the builder, W H Bull of Northampton. The name change took place following a petition by the residents.

At the meeting of the Borough Council that approved this change of name, it was implied that the street was renamed after the famous London street as none of its residents would object to the new choice of name.

Bonington Close

Lower Hillmorton, off Constable Road

1966

SP 536741

Richard Parkes Bonington (1802 – 28)

 English Romantic landscape painter.

His landscapes were mostly of coastal scenes, with a low horizon and large sky. He died of TB in London.

Boswell Road

off Tennyson Avenue

1959

SP 494731

James Boswell (1740 – 95)

Scottish lawyer, diarist and author.

He met Dr Samuel Johnson on several occasions and toured Scotland with him in 1763. His last meeting with Johnson was in 1784. His Life of Samuel Johnson, considered by many to be the most celebrated biography in the English language, was published in 1791.

Boundary Road

off Hillmorton Road

1932

SP 516745

The boundary of Rugby Parish

It runs along part of the boundary line between Rugby & Hillmorton parishes.

Prior to the boundary changes of 1932, it was also on the boundary line of Rugby Urban District Council.

Bowen Road

Hillmorton Paddox Estate, off Hillmorton Road

1925

SP 510742

Charles John Bowen Cooke J P (1859 - 1920)

The developer of the road, the Rugby Freehold Land Society, named it after Bowen Cooke, a former president (1903 - 20).

He was also the running superintendent at Rugby of the L&NW Railway and from 1909 until his death was chief mechanical engineer of the L&NWR

Brafield Leys

off Norton Leys

 

SP 501730

Brafield on the Green, a village south east of Northampton.

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Brindley Road

Hillmorton, off Lower Street

1966

SP 534742

James Brindley (1716 - 72)

A millwright, he became prominent as a builder of many of the early English canals. One of these was the Oxford Canal which passes near Rugby, although he died before it was completed

Brindley Road leads, via The Locks (qv), to a flight of three, doubled, locks on the Oxford Canal and some old buildings which were the local depot of the canal engineering department.

Bronte Close

off Clifton Road

1995

SP 514751

Charlotte, Emily and Anne Brontë (1816 - 55, 1818 - 48, 1820 – 49, respectively)

These sisters were renowned English novelists and poets.

A memorial tablet for the three sisters is in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

Bronte Close is on former site of the Rugby High School for Girls, which named one of its school houses after the sisters.

Browning Road

Hillmorton, Low Hills Estate, off Mellor Road

1961

SP 539738

Charles William Browning (1880 - 1947)

Mayor of Rugby (1936 - 37) and an alderman of both the Rugby Borough and Warwickshire County Councils.

He was the first Labour mayor, having been a trade union official and plasterer.

Buchanan Road

off Bilton Road

1937

SP 492745

David Buchanan BA (1830-1900)

He was a nationally known cricketer, having played for the Gentlemen of England and the All England Eleven. He was also a founder member & the first Captain of Warwickshire County Cricket Club (1882 - 83).

He was an elected member of the Local Board of Health and its successor, the Rugby Urban District Council (1881 - 99). Amongst his other local activities he was a player and officer of the Rugby Cricket Club and an officer of the Rugby Lawn Tennis Club.

Burnside

off Westfield Road

1938

SP 496746

 

It is presumed that it was so named because of the brook (or 'burn') that ran through the Wesfield estate.

The road was built on the 31½ acre estate attached to Westfield House in Bilton Road.

Among the former owners of the estate was Richard Pennington (1799 - 1885), a retired cotton manufacturer and merchant.

Butlers Leap

off Clifton Road

 

SP 521759

Named after a Rugby School boy named Butler

The boy is famed for jumping clear over Clifton Brook where it was crossed by the Clifton Road. The road and brook have since been re-aligned, thereby preventing similar 'leaps' in modern times.

Matthew Bloxam thought the boy was Spencer Percival Butler (1828 - 1915), son of the Rev Dr Butler of Gayton, Northants. WD Rouse says he was another son, Arthur Gray Butler (1832 - 1909).

Butler’s Leap runs through an industrial estate and has no residences.

Butlin Road

off Clifton Road

1920

SP 518754

Butlin family

Following the death of her husband, William Butlin (1730 - 91), a draper, Ann Butlin (1743 - 1826) acquired a banking business from Samuel Clay and re-named it Butlins Bank.

Ann Butlin's eldest child, William (1773 - 1837), managed the bank until his death. The Bank then passed into the ownership of the Benn family when it was inherited by William's youngest sister, Maria Benn, née Butlin, (1787 - 1881). It was sold to the Lloyds Banking Company in 1868.

Caldecott Street

Town centre, off Hillmorton Road

1879

SP 512747

Thomas Caldecott (1798 - 1875)

Lord of the Manor of Rugby (1826 - 75); High Sheriff of the County of Warwick.

He gave a site in Church Street, Rugby and paid for the erection of St Andrews Girls School (later known as Trinity Schools) upon it.

The land upon which Caldecott Street and Temple Street were built, was purchased by The Rugby Freehold Land Society in 1868 from the executors of the late Count Wratislaw.

Cambridge Street

off Clifton Road

1878

SP 512752

The reason behind this street name is not known.

As Cambridge Street was built about the same time as Oxford Street, it is presumed that both streets were named after the famous University towns.

Most clergy of the established church at that time obtained their degree at either Cambridge or Oxford University.

Campbell Street

New Bilton, off Lawford Road

1890s

SP 493753

James Archibald Campbell (1807 - 1879)

An experimental & scientific dairy farmer who owned Newland Farm in New Bilton. Also a prominent Rugby businessman and magistrate.

He was resident in Rugby from about 1850 until his decease. Apart from his farm, his interests included The Rugby Advertiser (proprietor and editor 1852 to 1860), the Rugby Hospital, the Workmen's Rest in Castle Street, the Warwickshire Scripture Readers Society and the Liberal Association.

Carew Walk

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cunningham Way

1960s

SP 482744

Sir George Carew, (1504 - 45)

Admiral, RN (1545)

Died when the Mary Rose foundered.

Catesby Road

off Hillmorton Road

1935

SP 517744

Robert Catesby (c1572 - 1605)

He was one of the leading conspirators of the unsuccessful Gunpowder Plot of 1605.

He was the owner of Ashby St Ledgers Manor where much of the Gunpowder Plot was planned.

Cawston Way

Bilton, off Magnet Lane

1918

SP 484736

Cawston Manor

Cawston adjoins Bilton to the SW. The Duke of Buccleuch’s family formerly owned much land there.

The name was suggested by the developers, the Rugby Provident Permanent Benefit Building Society. This Society has now merged with the Hinckley Building Society to become the Hinckley and Rugby Building Society.

Chapel Street

Town centre, off Market Place

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 503752

The Wesleyan (or Methodist) Chapel, which was erected in 1823.

The street, formerly known as Swan Street, was renamed following the erection of the Chapel in it.

In 1869 a new, enlarged, Methodist Church was opened in Market Place. The whole of their Chapel Street premises was then devoted for use by their day schools.

Charlesfield Road

Rokeby Estate, off Kingsway

1949

SP 501740

The reason behind this street name is uncertain.

As the names chosen for most of the roads on the Rokeby Estate have clear associations with the family of R H Wood who owned the land on which the roads were built, ‘Charlesfield’ probably also has a family connection.

It is a distinct possibility that the first part of the road’s name refers to Mr Wood’s great nephew, Captain Charles Edward Anderson, (1890 – 1916) who was killed in action in France during WW1.

Charlotte Street

off Railway Terrace

1868

SP 507753

Charlotte Anne Wratislaw, née Keele (1799 - 1863)

This street was developed by by Charlotte's husband Count William Ferdinand Wratislaw (1788 - 1853) on land that he owned.

see also William Street

Chaucer Road

Hillside, off Norton Leys

 

SP 498728

Geoffrey Chaucer (c1340 – 1400)

Hw was an administrator who held many important royal posts. He is also one of the greatest english poets.

He was buried in Westminster Abbey and the part of the south transept where his memorial exists is now known as Poets Corner.

Today he is best known as the the author of The Canterbury Tales.

Church Street

Town Centre, from Market Place

see Notes column

SP 503752

The parish church of St Andrew

The parish church has been situated in Church Street since the 12th century.

Church Street is one of the ancient streets of the town and is where Lawrence Sheriff founded the Grammar School that became Rugby School.

Church Walk

Town Centre, off Lawrence Sheriff Street

 

SP 505749

The parish church of St Andrew

This road/footpath leads to the parish church from Lawrence Sheriff Street.

Until 1891 the part of Church Walk that adjoined Lawrence Sheriff Street was named Church Road

Churchill Road

St Maries Estate, off Dunchurch Road

1958

SP 501745

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill KG, OM, CH, TD, PC, DL, FRS, RA (1874 – 1965)

He was a statesman who was British Prime Minister from 1940 to 1945 and from 1951 to 1955. During his time over fifty years as a British politician, in addition to being Prime Minister he held many other government offices.

Churchill was also an officer in the British Army, a historian, a writer and an artist. His writings included two biographies, three volumes of memoirs and several histories. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1953.

In 1920, Churchill rented School Field, the Rugby home of H C Bradby, for the six week polo season.

Claremont Road

off Clifton Road

1897

SP 511751

Possibly named after the Claremont mansion, near Esher, Surrey.

Claremont mansion was the residence of several distinguished people between 1708 & 1930.

Having initially been built only as far as Wells Street, Claremont Road was extended in 1905 to Craven Road.

At the time the road was built in Rugby, the mansion was the residence of Princess Helena, (1861 - 1922), the widow of Prince Leopold (1853 - 84), Duke of Albany, the fourth and youngest son of Queen Victoria.

Clarence Road

New Bilton, off Campbell Street

1899

SP 494754

Prince Albert Victor Christian Edward, Duke of Clarence and Avondale (1864 – 92)

He was the eldest son of King Edward VII, who he predeceased.

Duke of Clarence is a title which has been traditionally awarded to junior members of the English and British Royal families.

Clifton Road

off Church Street

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 506751

Clifton on Dunsmore village

Part of the historic route from Rugby to Clifton.

It became part of the Rugby and Harborough Turnpike (1801 - 78).

Collingwood Avenue

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Blackwood Avenue

1958

SP 487745

Cuthbert Collingwood, 1st Baron Collingwood, (1748 - 1810)

Vice-Admiral, RN (1805 - 1810)

Was second in command to Admiral Nelson at Trafalgar in 1805 in the Royal Sovereign.

Conrad Close

Hillside, off Norton Leys

 

SP 497729

Joseph Conrad (1857 – 1924) [formerly Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski]

Following a career in the merchant navy of France and later of Great Britain, he became a writer in English of novels and short stories that received both crtical and popular acclaim.

He was born of Polish parents and became a British subject in 1886.

Constable Road

Lower Hillmorton, off Brindley Road

1966

SP 536741

John Constable RA (1776 – 1837)

 English Romantic painter.

He is known particularly for his landscape paintings of the area around Dedham Vale in Suffolk—now known as "Constable Country".

Corbett Street

 

off Hunter Street

1884

SP 514754

Archibald Cameron Corbett (1856 - 1933), 1st Baron Rowallan

The street was built by Thomas Hunter (1827-88) the founder of the Thomas Hunter Wagon Works in Mill Road, It was named after Corbett by Hunter who was a supporter of the Liberal Party.

Corbett unsuccessfully contested the bye-election in June 1884 for the seat of North Warwickshire as a Liberal. This constituency included Rugby.

Cornwallis Road

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Frobisher Road

1961

SP 480743

Sir William Cornwallis GCB, (1744 - 1819)

Admiral, RN (1799 - 1806)

He commanded the Channel Fleet from 1801 to 1804.

Coverley Place

New Bilton, off Pendred Road

1937

SP 492750

Sir Roger de Coverley

He was a fictional character in The Spectator, who exemplified the values of an old country gentleman, "rather beloved than esteemed".

See also Steele Street.

The Council felt that the road should be given a name associated with Addison because it was near to Addison Road. It is also the name of an English country dance.

Cowan Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cornwallis Road

1970

SP 480744

Sir Walter Henry Cowan KCB, (1871 - 1956)

Admiral, RN (1927 - 31).

Although long since retired from the Royal Navy, he saw action with the Commandos in WW2 at the age of seventy.

Craven Road

off Railway Terrace

c 1884

SP 508757

Presumably named after the Craven family, latterly the Earls of Craven.

Combe Abbey was the residence of the Craven family from 1622 to 1923. The road was initially named Craven Street

The Craven family held the patronage of St Andrew's Church, Rugby from 1767 to the 20th century.

Cunningham Way

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Frobisher Road

1964

SP 482745

Andrew Browne Cunningham, 1st Viscount Cunningham of Hyndhope (1883 - 1963)

Admiral of the Fleet, RN (1943 - 1946)

Became 1st Sea Lord during WW2.

Curie Close

off Clifton Road

1995

SP 515752

Marie Skłodowska-Curie (1867 – 1934)

Polish physicist and chemist, famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity

Curie Close is on former site of Rugby High School for Girls, which named one of its school houses after her.

Dalkeith Avenue

Bilton, off Bawnmore Road

1912

SP 486735

Earl of Dalkeith

The eldest son and heir to the Duke of Buccleuch is given the courtesy title of Earl of Dalkeith.

The Dukes of Buccleuch and their family members owned much land in Dunchurch and Bilton in the 19th century.

The name was suggested by the developers, the Rugby Provident Permanent Benefit Building Society. This Society has now merged with the Hinckley Building Society to become the Hinckley and Rugby Building Society.

David Road

off Barton Road

1955

SP 490736

Dr Albert Augustus David (1867 - 1950)

Headmaster of Rugby School (1910 - 21) & Bishop of Liverpool (1923 - 44)

He was also a master at Rugby School (1892 - 99) and headmaster of Clifton School (1905 - 09). As headmaster of Rugby School his unorthodox views on teaching met with considerable opposition in some quarters.

Deane Road

Hillmorton, off Deerings Road

1955

SP 534739

The Right Rev Frederick Llewellyn Deane (1868 – 1952).

He was Bishop of Aberdeen and Orkney (1917 - 43). Whilst a teenager he had attended a private school in Rugby, from where he matriculated in 1887.at Keble College, Oxford.

His father, the Rev Francis Hugh Deane (1820 – 1904), had briefly been a curate at Hillmorton (1847- 49) and later was the Rector of South Kilworth, Leics (1887 – 1904).

Dewar Grove

Hillmorton, Abbott's Farm Estate, off McKinnell Crescent

1965

SP 524750

William Dewar (1846 - 1917)

He was chairman of Rugby Urban District Council (1909 – 12).

He was also an assistant master at Rugby School from 1888 - 1911.

Dickens Road

Hillside, off Norton Leys

 

SP 497730

Charles John Huffam Dickens (1812 -70)

Throughout his lierary carreer Dickens wrote many novels whose success made him the most popular novelist of the 19th century.

He was buried in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

He wrote fifteen novels, most of which were the best-sellers of the day. They were serialized in weekly and monthly magazines before being published in standard book format. Amongst his many other writings were a large number of short stories including several Christmas-themed stories, and several non-fiction works.

Ditton Close

Bilton, off Nelson Way

1950

SP 482738

Thames Ditton, Surrey

Willans and Robinson, which was one of the businesses that amalgamated in 1918 to form English Electric, made high-speed reciprocating steam engines at their Ferry Works site at Thames Ditton, from the 1870s until they moved to Rugby in 1896.

The houses in Ditton Close were built to provide accommodation for English Electric employees.

Drayton Leys

oiff Orson Leys

 

SP 500731

The hamlet of Drayton within the parish of Daventry, Northants.

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose communities in Northamptonshire is not known.

Dreyer Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cornwallis Road.

1990s

SP 481748

Sir Frederic Charles Dreyer GBE, KCB (1878 - 1956)

Admiral, RN (1932 - 43)

His son, Sir Desmond Parry Dreyer (1910 – 2003), was also an admiral.

Drury Lane

off Warwick Street

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 504750

Drury Lane Theatre, London

It was a mediaeval lane. Previously known as Back Lane and then Tinkers Lane.

A troupe of players from the London theatre played there.

Dryden Place

New Bilton, off Steele Street

1935

SP 491751

John Dryden (1631 - 1700).

He was an English poet, literary critic and playwright who became Poet Laureate in 1688.

The Council felt that the road should be given a name associated with Addison's contemporaries because it was near to Addison Road.

He is buried in the Poets Corner of Westminster Abbey.

Dukes Jetty

Town Centre, off High Street

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 503751

Arthur Joseph Dukes (1887 - 1965)

Mayor of Rugby (1949 - 50).

This short passage or "jetty" is of ancient origin, but was not named until 1956.

The Dukes’ family for many years had an ironmongery and grocery business in Sheep Street, Rugby. In its early days the entrance to their residence was in the "jetty".

Dunchurch Road

off Warwick Street

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 502750

Dunchurch Village

This was the historic route between Rugby & Dunchurch, and known as the Dunchurch road.

It probably started out as a bridle way. The first quarter mile between Warwick Street & Oak Street was known by the mid-Victorians as Dunchurch Street. It became part of the Rugby & Lutterworth Turnpike (1785 - 1878).

Dyson Close

Hillmorton, off Featherbed Lane

1965

SP 541742

Frank Dyson (1886 - 1969)

He was a member of the newly-formed Borough Council from 1932 to 1953.

He was also a builder and undertaker in Hillmorton.

Eastfield Place

Town Centre, off Little Church Street

Prior to 1849

SP 504751

Eastfield House

This street was known as New Street until 1935 when it was renamed to avoid confusion with the longer New Street in New Bilton.

‘Eastfield' appears in the 1871 census. Eastfield House became a preparatory school attached to the Arnold High School until its present use as the Masonic Hall.

Eastlands Road

off Clifton Road

1927

SP 516753

Eastlands Farm

The road was built on part of the former farm.

 

East Union Street

Town centre, off Dunchurch Road

A map of 1849 names this road as Union Street.

SP 502748

The origin of this street name is not known.

 

It provided a connecting link between the southern end of Union Street and Dunchurch Road. It initially may have been part of Union Street.

Ecton Leys

off Fawsley Leys

 

SP 503732

Ecton, a village east of Northampton.

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, used for grazing animals.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Eden Road

Abbott’s Farm Estate, Hillmorton, off Vere Road

1957

SP 526743

Thomas Bainbridge Eden (1856 - 1944)

He was chairman of the Rugby UDC (1900 - 03)

He was the headmaster of Hillbrow Preparatory School (1889 – 1908) in Barby Road. He had previously been teaching at Orwell House Preparatory School, Clifton on Dunsmore.

Elborow Street

off Corporation Street

1835

SP 500751

Richard Elborowe jun (c1645 - 1707)

see also 'Biographies' section of this website.

Local benefactor & freeman of London who founded the Elborow charity school & almshouses in Rugby.

The site of this street was owned in the 17th cen. by Richard Elborowe and in the early 19th cen. by Dr R R Bloxam (1765-1840), an assistant master at Rugby School (1791-1827) who sold it for residential development.

Elsee Road

Town Centre, off Moultrie Road

1901

SP 507750

Charles Elsee MA (1830 - 1912)

Assistant Master, Rugby School (1860 - 1901); Chairman of Rugby UDC (1895 - 1900); County Councillor (1888 - 1910); County Alderman (1910 - 12).

He was a member of the Board of Management of the Hospital of St Cross from 1887, being its Chairman from 1893 to his death in 1912; he was also a Governor of the Lawrence Sheriff School. Elsee Road was built on Reynolds Field, part of the St Andrew’s glebe lands.

Evans Road

Admirals Estate, Bilton, off Frobisher Road

1963

SP 482746

Edward Radcliffe Russell Garth Evans, 1st Baron Mountevans KCB DSO (1881 - 1957)

Admiral RN (1936 - 41)

He was in command of the Terra Nova the support ship that accompanied Scott's ill fated expedition of 1910-13 to the South Pole. He was in command of the destroyer HMS Broke in 1917 when it and the destroyer HMS Swift defeated 6 German destroyers in the Dover Straight. He later became Commander in Chief, The Nore, one of the Navy's major home commands  (1935 - 39)

Evreux Way

Town Centre, off North Street

1966

SP 503754

Evreux, Normandy,  France

The Borough Council chose this name for the section of Newbold Road in front of the Town Hall that had become separated by a roundabout from the remainder during the construction of Corporation Street.

Rugby was twinned with Evreux in 1959.

Fawsley Leys

off Long Furlong

 

SP 500735

Fawsley, a ‘lost’ village near to Daventry, Northants.

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Fenwick Drive

off High Street, Hillmorton

1939

SP 534736

George Anthony Fenwick, (c1841 - 1912)

Fenwick Drive was built on site of his house, The Croft, High Street, Hillmorton.

He was a retired banker from Newcastle upon Tyne where he was born.

Fisher Avenue

Hillmorton Paddox, off Ashlawn Road

1928

SP 524735

Benjamin Holden Fisher (1822 - 89)

He was the first secretary (1866 - 89) of the Rugby Land Society, which developed this road.

His son William Thomas Fisher (1852 - 1927) succeeded him as secretary of the Society (1889 - 1926).

Follager Road

off Gladstone Street

2005

SP 495757

Hugh Francis Fullagar (1872 – 1916)

He was a consulting engineer who patented a type of diesel engine. Willans and Robinson and its successor, English Electric, manufactured stationary engines to his basic design until the early 1950s.

The road was built on land formerly owned by Willans & Robinson and its successors. Rugby Borough Council admitted that they had mis-spelt the road name but said that it would be too disruptive to the residents to correct the road sign.

Fosterd Road

Newbold Glebe Estate, off Newbold Road

1950

SP 496766

Richard Fosterd

He bequeathed land & property in Frankton to provide an income for the maintenance of the Avon Bridge in Newbold Road.

An 1835 Parliamentary report of an enquiry into Charities states that the bequest was made by a Will bearing date 10th August 1508. Elsewhere the date is given as 1558.

Freemantle Road

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Blackwood Avenue

1959

SP 486745

Sir Thomas Francis Fremantle, GCB, (1765 - 1819)

Vice-Admiral, RN (1815 - 1819). Despite the origin of the name, the road name has always been spelt with a double 'e'.

Captain of the Neptune at Trafalgar & personal friend of Nelson. Other admirals in the Royal Navy who had this surname included Sir Edmund Robert Fremantle (1836-1929) and his eldest son, Sir Sydney Robert Fremantle (1867-1958), who were promoted to Admiral in 1896 and 1922 respectively.

Frobisher Road

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Lawford Lane

1964

SP 480742

Sir Martin Frobisher (c1535 - 1594)

Admiral, RN,

New World explorer who unsuccessfully sought the North West Passage.

Gainsborough Crescent

Lower Hillmorton, off Constable Road

1966

SP 536741

Thomas Gainsborough RA  (1727 – 88)

English painter.

A prolific painter of portraits and landscapes.

Garyth Williams Close

Overslade, off Marlborough Road

1991

SP 493738

Garyth Nicholas S Williams (1976 - 90)

When the original Mayfield Grove houses (built in 1947) were demolished in 1990 and replaced with new, the road was renamed in his memory.

Garyth died in a road accident whilst on his bicycle. He lived in one of the original Overslade Estate houses and had been one of those who had campaigned against their demolition.

Gibson Drive

Lower Hillmorton, off Lower Hillmorton Road

1966

SP 527744

Sidney George Gibson (1884 - 1965)

 

He was Mayor (1955-56) and a member of the Borough Council (1947 - 58).

 

He had a pumbing & heating engineering business and served as president of the Institute of Plumbers for a year.

Gladstone Street

off Avenue Road

1902

SP 494755

William Ewart Gladstone (1809 - 98)

He held 19 senior posts in government including 4 periods as Liberal prime minister between 1835 & 1894.

He represented 5 constituencies as a member of Parliament between 1832 & 1895. He was buried in the north transept of Westminster Abbey.

Goldsmith Avenue

Hillside, off Dunchurch Road

 

SP 497730

Oliver Goldsmith (c1728 – 74)

He was an Irish novelist, playwright and poet. There is a memorial tablet and bust of him in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

He is best known for his novel The Vicar of Wakefield, his poem The Deserted Village that laments the effect of enclosure upon traditional village life, and his play She Stoops to Conquer, a comedy of manners.

Greenhill Road

Overslade Estate, off Wentworth Road

1948

SP 496743

Nicholas Greenhill MA (d 1604)

Headmaster, Rugby School (1581 - 1604)

 

Grenville Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Frobisher Road

1961

SP 481744

Sir Richard Grenville, Kt, (1541 - 91)

Vice- Admiral of the Fleet (1591)

He was captured and died of his wounds whilst attempting to intercept the Spanish Treasure Fleet. He also took part in the fight against the Spanish Armada in 1588.

Hampden Way

Bilton, off Beswick Gardens

 

1912

SP 486732

Thomas Walter Brand, 3rd Viscount Hampden

Lady Katherine Montagu Douglas-Scott, daughter of the sixth Duke of Buccleuch a local landowner, married the third Viscount Hampden.

The name was suggested by the developers, the Rugby Provident Permanent Benefit Building Society. This Society has now merged with the Hinckley Building Society to become the Hinckley and Rugby Building Society.

Hardy Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cunningham Way

1964

SP 483744

Sir Thomas Masterman Hardy, 1st Baronet (1769 - 1839)

Vice-Admiral, RN (1837 - 39)

He was Nelson's Flag Captain at Trafalgar in 1805.

Harrison Close

Hillmorton, Low Hills Estate, off Mellor Road

1961

SP 539738

Joshua Clarke Harrison (1876 - 1954)

Mayor of Rugby (1937 - 38) and was an alderman of the Borough Council until he retired in 1945.

He was a grocer by trade and first became a councillor in 1921 in the Rugby UDC.

Hart Close

off Lower Hillmorton Road

1938

SP 519745

Rev. Sheldon Robert Hart MA (1863 - 1944)

He was headmaster of the Lawrence Sheriff School (1905 - 21)

Hart Field, the school's playing field, was named after him.

Heyford Leys

off Norton Leys

 

SP 498727

It is named after two adjoining villages, Nether Heyford and Upper Heyford, near to Daventry, Northants.

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Hibbert Close

off Dunchurch Road

1956

SP 501743

Captain John Hubert Washington Hibbert (1805 - 75)

Important benefactor to St Marie’s RC Church. He lived at Bilton Grange (c. 1841 - 61) and had the house completely remodelled by Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin (1812-52) in 1841-51.

Capt Hibbert paid for most, if not all, of the land and the original church building. Also made later donations and bequests to the church. His father was a Jamaican plantation owner.

High Street

Town Centre, off Market Place

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 503752

 

With Sheep Street, High Street was one of the historic town streets that formed the main shopping area.

High Street was incorporated in the route of the Rugby & Lutterworth Turnpike (1785 - 1878). High Street became one-way in 1938.

Hillmorton Road

off Lawrence Sheriff Street

See ‘notes’ column

SP 504749

It was one of two historic routes between Rugby and the village of Hillmorton

The road led to the village or hamlet of Hulle which grew up on the higher land to the south of the Domesday village of Moreton.

In medieval times Hulle and Moreton were merged to become Hillmorton.

Hobley Close

Bilton, off Barton Road

1956

SP 487735

Ernest Thomas Hobley (1884 - 1961)

He was Mayor of Rugby (1950-51) and a member of the Borough Council from 1935 to 1958.

His occupation was as a foreman fitter on the railway. For many years he was chairman of the council of the Rugby & District Amateur Association Football League.

Holcot Leys

off Fawsley Leys

 

SP 502731

Holcot, a village north of Northampton.

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Remarkably for a small village, Holcot has ten listed historic buildings including the church.

Holyoak Close

Bilton, off Nelson Way

1950

SP 482738

Henry Holyoake MA (1657 - 1731)

Headmaster, Rugby School (1688 - 1731).

Whilst Headmaster, Henry Holyoake was also Rector of Bourton on Dunsmore, Bilton & Harborough Magna at various times. He also increased the importance of Rugby School by attracting a high proportion of non-foundationers.

Hood's Way

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Blackwood Avenue

1955

SP 487745

Samuel Hood (1724 - 1816), 1st Viscount Hood of Whitley in the County of Warwick.

Admiral, RN (1794 - 95). He served throughout the American Revolutionary War (1775 –83) and was Commander in Chief, Mediterranean Fleet (1793 –94) during the French Revolutionary Wars. He was one of the chief mourners at the funeral of Horatio Nelson in 1805.

2 other family members with the Hood surname also became Admirals about this time and another during WW1.

Houston Road

Brownsover, off Boughton Road

1937

SP 512767

British Thomson-Houston Company (see 'Industry' section of this website.)

This company was for much of the 20th Cen. the town's chief employer of labour.

Edwin James Houston (1847 - 1914), born in Virginia, USA, was a co-founder of the American Electric Company, which became the (American) Thomson-Houston Electric Company.

Hudson Road

Overslade Estate, off St Annes Road

1950

SP 491743

Robert Spencer Hudson (1867 - 1957) - see 'Biographies' section of this website.

He was chairman of Rugby Urban District Council in 1932 & Mayor of Rugby (1935 - 36).

It had been proposed by the developers to name this road, Ashdown Road, but this was rejected by the RBC following complaints by the Post Office that it could be confused with Ashlawn Road.

He was Work's Manager for J Parmell & Son, the Rugby builders from 1900 to 1945.

Hunter Street

off Cambridge Street

c1880

SP 514754

Thomas Hunter (1827-1888)

Thomas Hunter founded the Thomas Hunter Wagon Works in Mill Road in 1871. He built Hunter Street on land purchased from the Rugby Freehold Land Society.

About 1886 he was succeeded as Manager of the Wagon Works by his eldest son, Thomas Hunter (1864-1923).

Izod Road

off Gladstone Street

2005

SP 496757

Edwin Gilbert Izod (1876–1946)

He was an experimental test engineer at the Willans & Robinson Works. Whilst there, he invented the impact test procedure that is named after him and is widely used to measure the impact resistance of materials.

Izod Road was built on land formerly owned by Willans & Robinson and its successors.

James Street

Town Centre, off Albert Street

1851

SP 505758

James Richardson (25 Aug 1827 - 31 Aug 1827)

His mother, Mrs Anne Richardson (1791 - 1861) owned the land on which the street was made.

She inherited considerable land in 1828 on the death of her husband, James Richardson snr.  James jun. was her youngest son. See also Albert Street.

John Thwaites Close

off Russelsheim Way

1981

SP 500748

John A Thwaites (1931 - 79)

He was the first Chief Executive of Rugby Borough Council following its re-organisation in 1974.

He moved to Rugby in 1970 as deputy town clerk. He died in a road accident.

Kennedy Drive

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cornwallis Road

1990s

SP 482749

Sir William Robert  Kennedy, GCB,  (1838 - 1916)

Admiral, RN (1901)

He was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the East Indies in 1892 and Commander-in-Chief, The Nore in 1900.

Keppel Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Frobisher Road

1961

SP 482744

Augustus Keppel, 1st Viscount Keppel (1725 - 86)

Vice Admiral, RN (1770 - 79)

He was with Anson on his renowned voyage around the world. He was 1st Lord of the Admiralty (1782 - 83). HMS Keppel, a RN destroyer named after Viscount Keppel, was adopted by the town of Rugby during WW2.

Keyes Drive

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cornwallis Road

1990s

SP 483749

Roger John Brownlow Keyes, 1st Baron Keyes (1872 - 1945)

Admiral of the Fleet, RN (1930 - 31)

Became Director of Operations, 1940 to 1941.

Kingsley Avenue

Hillmorton, off Hillmorton Road

 1930

SP 525740

Kingsley Avenue, Daventry.

The developer of this small estate, William Henry Adams (1874-1934), named this road after the road in Daventry where he lived before coming to Rugby.

This information was provided by Cedric Thomas Adams, the son of the developer, in his letter to the Rugby Advertiser dated 11 August 1983.

Kirkby Road

Hillmorton, off Millfields Avenue

 1940

SP 526740

Adeliza Adams, née Kirkby (1870-1953)

The developer of this small estate, William Henry Adams (1874-1934), named this road after the maiden name of his wife,

This information was provided by Cedric Thomas Adams, the son of the developer, in his letter to the Rugby Advertiser dated 11 August 1983.

Landseer Close

Lower Hillmorton, off Constable Road

1966

SP 537740

Sir Edwin Henry Landseer RA (1802 – 73)

English painter and sculptor

Well known for his paintings of animals—particularly horses, dogs and stags. Best known as the sculptor of the lions in Trafalgar Square, London.

Lawford Road

off Corporation Street

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 500750

This is on the route of the ancient track that joined Rugby and Church Lawford.

It was part of a longer track that ran parallel with the River Avon from the Fosse Way to Watling Street.

This road attained prominence about 1870 with the establishment of the cement works and the subsequent development of New Bilton.

Lawrence Sheriff Street

Town Centre, off Warwick Street

See ‘notes’ column

SP 502750

Lawrence Sheriff (c1515 - 67)

see also 'Biographies' section of this website.

He founded Rugby School in 1567 which now stands on Lawrence Sheriff Street.

In the 19th century this street was described as the "King's Highway"; it later was known as School Street before being given its present name in the mid 19th century.

Lea Crescent

Newbold, off Parkfield Road

1951

SP 482764

Reginald Stephen Lea MA (1846 - 1925)

In 1904 he donated to the town its first purpose built, horse drawn ambulance. It was named the 'Mary Wood' ambulance after his childhood nurse.

He was headmaster (1876 - 86) of the Oakfield Preparatory School in Bilton Road & a lieutenant in the Rugby Volunteer Fire Brigade.

Lestock Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cornwallis Road

1961

SP 490746

Richard Lestock, (1679 - 1746)

Admiral, RN (1796)

Involved in the defeat of the RN at the Battle of Toulon (1744).

Linnell Road

Hillmorton, Abbott's Farm Estate, off Lower Hillmorton Road

1956

SP 528744

William Henry Linnell (1850 - 1928)

He was chairman of Rugby UDC (1907 - 09)

His occupation was a builder.

Little Church Street

Town centre, off Lawrence Sheriff Street

See ‘notes’ column

SP 504750

St Andrew's Church

This street gave direct access to the parish church from the Hillmorton Road & Barby Road

The street features in a plan of 15th century Rugby, when it was known as 'Old Town Street'.

Little Elborow Street

off Corporation Street

1835

SP 501751

Richard Elborowe jun (c1645 - 1707)

Local benefactor & Freeman of City of London who founded in Rugby the Elborow charity school & almshouses.

The site of this street was owned in the 17th cen by Richard Elborowe and in the early 19th cen by Dr R R Bloxam (1765-1840), an assistant master at Rugby School (1791-1827) who sold it for residential development.

Little Pennington Street

off Plowman Street

1835 – 1845

SP 498751

This street is reputedly named after Mrs Rebecca Pennington.

In 1748 she sold to Rugby School the Old Mansion House and adjoining land that became the site of the present School House.

The house had previously been purchased about 1720 by Mrs Pennington’s father, Henry Plowman of Northampton, from the Burnaby family who had been Lords of the Manor of Rugby from 1594 to 1720.

Loverock Crescent

Hillmorton, Abbott's Farm Estate, off Lower Hillmorton Road

1956

SP 524745

Lewis Loverock (1858 - 1932)

He was a chairman of the Rugby UDC (1912 - 14 & 1921 - 23). He was also an Alderman of the Warwickshire County Council (1923 – 1932). At his death he was the Deputy Charter Mayor of Rugby and had been offered the position of first Mayor of Rugby.

His occupation was a draper. At his death he was chairman of Rugby Gas Company and was also a governor of Lawrence Sheriff School.

His father was George Loverock (1832 - 98), also a draper and a member of the UDC.

Lower Hillmorton Road

off Clifton Road

 

SP 509751

It was one of two historic routes between Rugby and the village of Hillmorton

The road led to the low lying Domesday village of Moreton.

In medieval times Moreton became known as Hillmorton when it was merged with the hamlet or village of Hulle that had grown up on the higher land to the south of Moreton.

Macaulay Road

off Shakespeare Gardens

1959

SP 494734

Thomas Babington Macaulay, (1800 – 59), Baron Macaulay of Rothley, Leicestershire.

See also ‘Notes’ section.

He was a historian, essayist and poet. He was also a Whig politician who became a Member of Parliament for most of 1830 – 1856. During that time he held office as Secretary of War (1839 – 41) and Paymaster-General (1846 – 48).

Possibly best known for his “History of England from the accession of James II”. The fifth and last volume, taking it to the death of William II in 1702, was completed and published posthumously by his sister.

He is buried in the Poets Corner of Westminster Abbey.

Alternatively Macaulay Road was named after Dame (Emilie) Rose Macaulay DBE (1881 – 1958), novelist. She was born in Rugby, the second of the seven children of George Campbell Macaulay (1852–1915), assistant master at Rugby School. Among her Macaulay antecedents was Thomas B. Macaulay, a first cousin of her paternal grandfather. Her family moved from Rugby in 1887.

She was made a DBE in 1958.

Madden Place

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cornwallis Road

1990s

SP 483749

Sir Charles Edward Madden, 1st Baronet, (1862 - 1935)

Admiral of the Fleet, RN (1924 - 30)

His son was also an admiral in the RN.

Magnet Lane

Bilton, off Main Street

1921

SP 482736

‘The Magnet’ coffee room.

The Magnet coffee room had been set up in Bilton in 1875 by the Reverend Richard Orme Assheton MA (1836 – 1909), and a noted member of the temperance movement, in an attempt to ‘draw’ working men away from the public houses of the village.

The Reverend Richard Orme Assheton was the Rector of St Mark’s Church, Bilton, (1862 – 95).

Maple Grove

off Lancaster Road

c 1915

SP 503758

 

It is said to have been named so because the pavement was originally lined with Maple trees

See also Acacia, Poplar & Sycamore Groves.

Market Place

Town centre

See ‘notes’ column

SP 503752

Street market

This is at the historic centre of the town. Street markets were held in Market Place until April 1953, when they were moved to Church Street.

Prior to the end of the 17th cen. a market cross stood near to the site of the present clock tower and the site was known The Cross.

Market Street

Between Railway Terrace and Bath Street.

c 1903

SP 508755

Cattle Market

Believed to be so named because of its proximity to the then site of the cattle market.  (See also the entry for Sheep Street).

The cattle market was moved to a site near to the railway station when the lease on Reynolds Field expired in 1878. The market remained there until May 2008 when it was closed and the business moved to Stoneleigh Park near Leamington.

McKinnell Crescent

Hillmorton, Abbott's Farm Estate, off Loverock Crescent

1965

SP 534745

James Jesse McKinnell CBE (1869 - 1950)

JP for Warwickshire; Chairman of Rugby UDC (1914 - 19); County Councillor (1917 - 21); Mayor of Rugby (1932 - 34)

He was born In Rugby and had a grocery shop at 27 Sheep Street, Rugby, until his retirement about 1927.

Merttens Drive

Rugby, off Bilton Road

1964

SP 499749

Fredrick Merttens (1849-1935)

He was a philanthropist and active promoter of Adult Education. He presented the Merttens’ Playing Field in Bilton Road to Warwickshire County Council for the use of local children. When the drive leading to the playing field was later made up by the County Council after the building of Brooke School, it was named after Mr Merttens.

Frederick Merttens was born in Germany. He established in Manchester a successful export business in textiles. Having earlier retired from business through ill-health, he came to Rugby in 1905. He took an active part in the affairs of the town, including being a Justice of the Peace for Warwickshire, and a member of the Board of Management of St Cross Hospital.

Millfields Avenue

Hillmorton, off Kingsley Avenue

 1931

SP 520740

Hillmorton Windmill

The name Millfields was derived by the developer, William Henry Adams, from the windmill that formerly stood on the nearby mound in the Hillmorton Recreation Gound.

This information was provided by Cedric Thomas Adams, the son of the developer, in his letter to the Rugby Advertiser dated 11 August 1983.

Montgomery Drive

Bilton, off Nelson Way

1949

SP 481740

Bernard Law Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein, KGGCBDSOPC (1887 – 1976)

He served in the British Army from 1908 to 1958. He followed his success in defeating Rommel’s Panzer Corps in North Africa by being one of the outstanding Allied commanders in World War II and was appointed Field Marshal in 1944.

He commenced his career with the Ist Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment with whom he served in France in the WW1 until he was injured. Among his other appointments between the world wars was as Company Commander of the Regiment.

Following WWII, his commands included being Chief of the Imperial General Staff (1946 – 1948) and Deputy Supreme Commander, Europe, of NATO (1951–58).

Montrose Road

Rokeby Estate, off Kingsway

1938

SP 501740

The reason behind this street name is not known.

As the names chosen for most of the roads on the Rokeby Estate have clear associations with the family of R H Wood who owned the land on which the roads were built, ‘Montrose’ probably also has a family connection.

It has been speculated that ‘Montrose’ is a combinationof the ‘Mont’ in Belmont Road and the ‘Rose’ in Rosewood Avenue (qv).

Morson Crescent

Hillmorton, Abbott's Farm Estate, off Loverock Crescent

1956

SP 524748

Arthur Morson (1859 - 1931)

He was chairman of the Rugby UDC (1905 - 07); he became clerk to the UDC (1907 - 27).

 

Moultrie Road

Town Centre, off Clifton Road

c1901

SP 507751

Rev John Moultrie (1799 - 1874)

Rector of St Andrews, Rugby (1825 - 1874). Also a poet & hymn writer.

He died of smallpox that he caught whilst ministering to patients at the isolation hospital in Barby Road.

Murray Road

Town Centre, off Clifton Road

1898

SP 508751

John Murray MA (1828 - 99)

Rector of St Andrews, Rugby (1875 - 98)

He sold about 18 acres of glebe land over which Murray Road now passes. 

When first built, Murray Road only extended north from Clifton Road to Wells Street. At that time the present section of road between Craven Road and the railway was known as Brownsover Mill Road (see also Mill Road). In about 1905 Murray Road was extended to Craven Road to make a throughway to the railway. The section of Mill Road south of the railway was also renamed as Murray Road.

Murrayian Close

off Murray Road

1983

SP 508752

St Andrew's Murray School (1882 - 1965)

This close was built on the site of the former school.

The close was named at the request of the Old Murrayian Association, the former pupils of Murray School.

Myers Road

Hillmorton, Low Hills Estate, off Packwood Road

1961

SP 539738

Richard Henry Myers (1866 - 1943)

Mayor of Rugby (1938 - 40).

He was headmaster of St Matthew’s Boys School.

Naseby Road

off Cromwell Road

1932

SP 511744

William Naseby (1816 - 1907)

He lived in Hillmorton Road near the present entrance to Cromwell Road. His cottage was known as Naseby House.

He was a market gardener.

Nelson Way

Bilton, off Lawford Lane

1949

SP 481740

George Horatio Nelson, 1st Baron Nelson of Stafford (1887 - 1962)

Chairman of English Electric (1930 - 1962). He was knighted in 1943, created a baronet in 1955 and received his peerage in 1960.

243 homes in Nelson Way and the adjoining roads were built after WW2 by English Electric for key employees. When they were first built, the area was known as the Kingsway Estate after the English Electric head office in London, Kingsway House.

Newbold Road

Town centre, off Corporation Street

see Notes column

SP 501755

Newbold on Avon village.

This was the route of the historic road to Newbold-on-Avon, a continuation of North Street.

It was part of the Rugby & Lutterworth Turnpike (1785 - 1878). In the 1841 census it was known as Mill Street, but by the end of that decade it had been given its present name.

North Street

Town Centre, off Market Place

see Notes column

SP 503752

 

An ancient road that led to the north of the town centre.

It was part of the Rugby & Lutterworth Turnpike (1785 - 1878). In the 1841 census it was known as Mill Street, but by the end of that decade it was given its present name.

Norton Leys

off Goldsmith Avenue

 

SP 497730

The village of Norton, about two miles east of Daventry, Northants.

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Near to Norton, on Watling Street, is the Roman settlement of Bannaventa.

Oakfield Road

off Westfield Road

1938

SP 496746

Oakfield House, a house on the opposite side of Bilton Road was later used as a preparatory school.

The road was built on the 31½ acre estate attached to Westfield House in Bilton Road.

Oakfield Preparatory School for Boys existed from the middle of the 19th cen. to the 1920s. The house then became a private club and is now commercial offices.

Omega Place

off Railway Terrace

1994

SP 508757

Omega Lamp Works

Site of the old BTH Lamp Works, when purchased in 1926.  Building demolished in 1994 to make way for sheltered housing known as Omega Place.

The building previously was a skating rink; later, until 1984, it was known as the “Omega Lamp Works”.

Orson Leys

off Dunchurch Road

 

SP 498733

The origin of this name is not known.

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

As all of the other Rugby ‘Leys’ are associated with communities in Northants, it is a possibility that this name should have been ‘Orton’, a village near to Rothwell, Northants.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

The Orton Trust run short courses in Stone Masonary and Stone Carving in a converted medieval church at Orton.

Oval Road

Hillmorton Paddox Estate, off Sidney Road

1926

SP 518539

 

The Rugby Freehold Land Society named this road on account of its shape.

Oval Road was buiilt on Brown's Farm Estate, near the Paddox when it was developed by the Rugby Freehold Land Society.

Oxford Street

off Clifton Road

1877

SP 511751

 

The reason behind this street name is not known.

As Cambridge Street was built about the same time as Oxford Street, it is presumed that both were named after the famous University towns.

Most clergy of the established church at that time obtained their degree at either Cambridge or Oxford University.

Packwood Avenue

Hillmorton, Low Hills Estate, off Mellor Road

1961

SP 539738

Sidney Packwood Smart  (1883-1955)

Mayor of Rugby (1943 – 44) and served on the borough council from 1932 – 52.

His occupation was a railway signalman.

Paradise Street

off Clifton Road

1870

SP 511751

not known

This street received its name at the request of Theodore Marc Wratislaw (1831 - 1919), the owner of the land.

It may have been so named because it backs upon the Clifton Road cemetery.

Pendred Road

New Bilton, off Addison Road

1921

SP 490750

John William Pendred (1871 - 1934)

He was clerk to the Rugby and Crick Rural District Councils (1895 - 1934)

He was also clerk to the Rugby Board of Guardians for 29 years.

Pennington Street

off Plowman Street

c1835

SP 499751

This street is reputedly named after Mrs Rebecca Pennington.

 In 1748 she sold to Rugby School the Old Mansion House and adjoining land that became the site of the present School House.

The Old Mansion House had previously been purchased about 1720 by Mrs Pennington’s father, Henry Plowman of Northampton, from the Burnaby family who had been Lords of the Manor of Rugby from 1594 to 1720.

The Pennington family of Westfield House, Rugby, came to Rugby in 1858, much later than the naming of Pennington Street. No relationship between them and Mrs Rebecca Pennington has been established.

Percival Road

Hillmorton Paddox Estate, off Hillmorton Road

1924

SP 519743

Dr John Percival MA (1834 - 1918)

Dr Percival was a headmaster of Rugby School (1887 – 95), later becoming Bishop of Hereford (1895 – 1917). The road was named by the Rugby Freehold Land Society, its developer.

Matthew Bloxam’s former home was purchased for a memorial to Dr Percival with subscriptions from Old Rugbeians. It became The Percival Guildhouse, an Adult Education Centre.

Pettiver Crescent

Hillmorton, off Featherbed Lane

1954

SP 531740

James Pettiver, FRS, (c1663 – 1718)

An apothecary & celebrated naturalist and botanist. He was born in Hillmorton.

He was a nephew of Richard Elborowe, junior. His collection of specimens was purchased by Sir Hans Sloane, PRS, (1660 – 1753), a collector of natural history objects and other curiosities which in 1759 became exhibits in the newly founded British Museum and later in the Natural History Museum.

Phipps Avenue

Abbotts Farm Estate, off Bromwich Road

1956

SP 528541

Henry Thomas Purdie Phipps (1896 - 1953)

He was a member of the borough council from 1943 to 1953.

His occupation was an engineering estimator at the BTH. He had been President of the Warwickshire County AAA in 1938 & President of the English Cross Country Union in 1948.

Pinders Lane

Off Albert Street

pre 1837

SP 507756

The reason behind the naming of this ancient lane is obscure.

A pinder was an officer of a manor who was authorised to impound stray animals.

Pinder is a common surname throughout the parish records for Rugby and it is probable that the lane is named after one of these inhabitants.

There is no record of there ever having been an animal pound in this part of the town.

Pinders Lane features in the 1851 census returns. However it is said that the original name of the upper part was East Leyes.

Pinders Lane was reduced to its present length during the redevelopment of the James Street/ Railway Terrace area in the 1980s. Formerly the upper part continued through that area from Albert Street to Castle Street. (see also Charles Warren Close).

Pinfold Street

New Bilton, off Lawford Road

c1881

SP 493754

Jonathan Dumbleton Pinfold (1825 - 1910)

Pinfold built the street on his land to provide cottages for his brickmaking employees.

He had a business as an engineer and millwright in Pinders Lane and later in Plowman Street. He also became a brickmaker in New Bilton and a trustee of the Rugby Freehold Land Society (1871 - 89).

Pipewell Close

Bilton, off Montgomery Drive

1948

SP 483741

Pipewell was a Cistercian abbey in Northamtonshire near Corby.

Among the Abbey’s possessions were several granges in an around Dunchurch, including one on land where Rugby School Close is situated, The most important of these granges was Cawston.

In common with most other monasteries, Pipewell was suppressed by King Henry VIII in 1538 and its properties passed into secular ownership.

Plomer Close

Bilton, off Nelson Way

1948

SP 482738

John Plomer MA (1688 - 1759)

Headmaster, Rugby School (1731 - 42)

Also Rector of Bilton (1731 - 59)

Plowman Street

off Lawford Road

Prior to 1848

SP 499751

Henry Plowman of Northampton, gent.

In 1720 he purchased from the Burnaby family their former manorial estate of Rugby. The manorial rights were sold separately to William Boughton (1682 - 1720) of Bilton.

In 1749 his daughter, Mrs Rebecca Pennington, sold the former manor house to Rugby School (see Pennington Street). In 1853 the first purpose built police station in Rugby was erected in Plowman Street.

Until the 1990s Plowman Street included a short terrace of houses that are listed in the Rugby Almanacks as Cherry Terrace.

Pope Street

New Bilton, off Addison Road

1935

SP 490752

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

He was an English poet, satirist and translator of Homer.

In 1994 a memorial to Pope was erected in the Poets Corner of Westminster Abbey.

The Council felt that the road should be given a name associated with Addison's contemporaries because it was near to Addison Road.

Poplar Grove

off Lancaster Road

c1915

SP 508758

 

It is said that it was named so because the pavement was originally lined with Poplar trees

See also Acacia, Maple & Sycamore Groves

Queensferry Close

Bilton, off Nelson Way

1953

SP 483539

Queensferry, Flintshire, North Wales.

Willans and Robinson, which was one of the businesses that amalgamated in 1918 to form the English Electric Co., had a manufacturing plant at Queensferry from 1899 to 1910.

The turbine hall, built between 1901 and 1906, was designed by H B Creswell, and was described by Sir Nicholas Pevsner(1902-83)as a rare English precursor of Functionalism. (see also Creswell Place). 

The flats in Queensferry Close were built to provide accommodation for English Electric employees.

Railway Terrace When  

off Church Street

1841

SP 508751

London & Birmingham Railway and the Midland Counties Railway.

This street was built by the Midland Counties Railway to provide access from the town to the second of the railway stations.

The Rugby UDC decided in November 1910 that new name plates be fixed at convenient positions in the road in an attempt to dispense with its unofficial name of Station Road that was in frequent use at the time.

In its early years it was notorious for the bad image of the town that it presented to railway visitors due to its poor, muddy condition.

Rainsbrook Avenue

Hillmorton Paddox, off Hillmorton Road

1922

SP 528737

Rains Brook

Rains Brook runs through a valley to the south of Rugby and is a tributary of the River Leam.

For part of its length, Rains Brook forms the southern boundary of the Borough.

Regent Place

Town Centre, off Regent Street

1905

SP 504753

Part of the Regent Street development

Initially the western and northern sides of the undeveloped triangle of land on this site were named as St Andrews Street and Moat Street respectively.

In 1925 St Andrews Street & Moat Street were renamed as Regent Place.

Regent Street

Town Centre, off Church Street

1905

SP 504752

Regent Street, the famous shopping street in London.

When the Rugby Freehold Land Society developed the Moat Estate, their intention was that Regent Street was to become Rugby's main shopping street.

The developers’ intentions have largely been unfulfilled, but this has meant that iRegent Street remains remarkably unspoilt and retains many of its Edwardian features, especially the upper floors.

Reynolds Close

Lower Hillmorton, off Constable Road

1966

SP 537740

Sir Joshua Reynolds RA, FRS, FRSA,  (1723 - 92)

English Artist.

Famous for his portraits. He was the 1st President of the Royal Academy (1768 – 92).

Richmond Road

off Slade Road

1932

SP 514547

Joseph Richmond MA (1720 - 1816)

Headmaster, Rugby School (1751 - 55)

He made no entries in the school Register, so there are no records by which to judge his time as headmaster.

Rodney Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Frobisher Road

1961

SP 480743

George Brydges Rodney, 1st Baron Rodney,  (1718 - 92)

Admiral, RN (1778 - 82)

He was active at sea for most of his service career (1732 - 82). During his career he made a large amount of prize money.

Rosewood Avenue

Rokeby Estate, off Anderson Avenue

1955

SP 502738

Stanley Rose Wood (b 1848)

He was the nephew of Richard Henry Wood. “Rose” was the maiden name of the latter’s mother.

Rokeby Estate was built on part of the former Rokeby Farm that had been owned by Richard Henry Wood. (see also Belmont Road).

 

Round Street

off Lawford Road

1848

SP 498751

Whinfield Stephen Round MA (c1788 - 1864)

The Round Street estate was built on land that he owned.

Whinfield S Round was a prominent Rugby landowner & barrister at law. He did not live in Rugby.

Rupert Brooke Road

off Shakespeare Gardens

1960

SP 493734

Rupert Chawner Brooke (1887 – 1915)

see also 'Biographies' section of this website.

Poet. He is particularly known for his five war sonnets written during WW1.

He is one of 16 WW1 poets who are named on a memorial slab that was unveiled on 11 November 1985 in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

He was born in Hillmorton Road, Rugby and attended Rugby School. During WW1 he obtained a commission in the Royal Navy and died from blood poisoning whilst in a hospital ship moored off the Greek island of Skyros in the Aegean.

Ruskin Close

Hillside, off Norton Leys

 

SP 497729

John Ruskin (1819 – 1900)

He was an influential art and social critic whose ideas had an important role in the shaping of the cultural values of the nineteenth century.

A memorial to Ruskin is in the Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

Brantwood, his country home overlooking Coniston Water, is now a museum dedicated to Ruskin.

Russelsheim Way

Town centre gyratory road system

1981

SP 500749

Russelsheim, Germany

This road marks the twinning in 1977 by Rugby Borough with Russelsheim in Germany

Russelsheim is noted for manufacturing Opel cars, now part of General Motors.

Seabroke Avenue

off Lawford Road

c1919

SP 496451

George Mitchell Seabroke (c1848 - 1918)

Solicitor (1870 - 1918), Clerk to the Justices for Rugby Petty Sessional Division (1871 - 1918), Chief Officer of Rugby Volunteer Fire Brigade (1875 - 1918), amember of Board of Health & the Urban District Council (1875 - 1900).

Some time after 1891, Seabroke moved to 'Rosemount', a large house in Lawford Road situated opposite to the present junction with Seabroke Avenue.

Shakespeare Gardens

off Dunchurch Road

1959

SP 497733

William Shakespeare (1564 – 1616)

Poet and dramatist. As a playright he has a world-wide reputation.

In 1740 a memorial to Shakespeare was erected in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

He was born at Stratford-upon-Avon. He was buried in Holy Trinity, the parish church of Stratford-uoon-Avon.

Sheridan Close

Hillside, off Norton Leys

 

SP 498731

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 – 1816)

Irish playwright and politician. He has been described as the greatest comic dramatist of modern times. He later became a Whig MP at Westminster (1780 -1812)

He is best known today as the author of the comic plays,The Rivals and The School for Scandal.

He was buried in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

Sheriff Road

off Eastlands Road

1926

SP 517750

Lawrence Sheriff (c1515 - 67)

see also 'Biographies' section of this website.

He founded Rugby School in 1567.

It is presumed that this road is another reminder of this famous Rugbeian.

Sidney Road

Hillmorton Paddox Estate, off Hillmorton Road

1925

SP 521741

Sidney John Dicksee (1855 - 1922)

Sidney Dicksee was the head of the well known building and contracting firm of Foster & Dicksee of Rugby and London. He was also president of the Rugby Freehold Land Society (1920-22);

Sidney Road was a development on Brown's Farm Estate, near the Paddox by the Rugby Freehold Land Society. The road was named by the Society to perpetuate the memory of their recently deceased president.

Somers Road

New Bilton, off Addison Road

 

SP 490753

Sgt. James Somers VC (1893 - 1918)

Sgt Somers was briefly billeted with Mr & Mrs William Burn at 16, Corbett Street, Rugby, early in 1915. After his investiture in 1915 at Buckingham Palace he revisited Rugby and received a civic welcome.

Somers Road is part of an industrial estate and has no residential properties.

James Somers came from Clough-Jordan, Tipperary and was in the 1st Inniskilling Fusiliers. He was awarded the Victoria Cross in 1915 for gallantry in holding a trench against overwhelming odds at the Dardanelles.

 

Southbrook Road

Rokeby Estate, off Kingsway

1941

SP 500741

Sow Brook

South Brook is an alternative name for the more generally accepted Sow Brook. The brook runs through the land on which the Rokeby Estate was built.

Rokeby Estate was built on part of the former Rokeby Farm. (see also Belmont Road).

 

Southey Road

off Macaulay Road

1959

SP 494733

Robert Southey (1774 – 1843)

Southey was a poet and reviewer and another of the main figures of a group of poets who lived in the Lake District at the turn of the nineteenth century who were called the Lake Poets. He was Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom from 1813 until his death in 1843.

His memorial is in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

 

Southey was also a prolific letter writer, literary scholar, essay writer, historian and biographer. His biographies include those for John Bunyan, John Wesley, William Cowper, Oliver Cromwell and Horatio Nelson, with the latter probably his best known.

Spicer Place

Bilton, off Bilton Road

1973

SP 486741

Walter Harold Spicer (1890 - 1965)

He was the Engineer and Surveyor to Rugby Borough Council from 1930 to 1950 when he retired.

During his employment from 1921 to 1950 in the Engineering Department of the Borough Council (and its predecessor the Rugby Urban District Council), he had also been their Water Engineer and Gas Examiner.

Walter Spicer died at his home in Hampden Way, Bilton.

Spicer Place was built on the site of Bilton Rise, a large Victorian house with extensive grounds.

Staverton Leys

off Orson Leys

 

SP 500731

Staverton a village near to Daventry, Northants

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Steele Street

New Bilton, off Addison Road

1935

SP 490751

Richard Steele (1672 - 1729)

He was an Irish writer and politician, who co-founded with his friend, Joseph Addison, the Tatler magazine in 1709 and The Spectator magazine in 1711.

The Council felt that the road should be given a name associated with Addison's contemporaries because it was near to Addison Road.

St Marks Avenue

Bilton, off Cawston Way

1914

SP 484735

St Mark’s, the parish church of Bilton.

A church in Bilton features in the Domesday Book. Pevsner in his “Buildings of Warwickshire”, states that the current building dates from the early 14th century with much 19th century restoration.

The name was suggested by the developers, the Rugby Provident Permanent Benefit Building Society. This Society has now merged with the Hinckley Building Society to become the Hinckley and Rugby Building Society.

St Matthews Street

off Lawrence Sheriff Street

1842

SP 502750

St Matthew’s Church, Warwick Street

The street was built shortly after the church

The land upon which both the church and the street were built was previously owned by Dr R R Bloxam (1765-1840), an assistant master at Rugby School (1791-1827), and father of Matthew Bloxam. (see also Bloxam Place.)

St Peters Road

off Clifton Road

1905

SP 515752

St Peter's Church, Clifton Road.

The road was made adjacent to the church.

St Peters Road runs from Clifton Road to Lower Hillmorton Road.

Studland Avenue

Hillmorton, off Kingsley Avenue

 1939

SP 525741

Studland Bay, Dorset.

Studland Avenue was named by the developer, William Henry Adams (1873-1934) after Studland Bay which was a favourite holiday resort of his family.

This information was provided by Cedric Thomas Adams, the son of the developer, in his letter to the Rugby Advertiser dated 11 August 1983.

Sycamore Grove

off Lancaster Road

1913

SP 504757

 

Named so because the pavement was originally lined with Sycamore trees

See also Acacia, Maple & Poplar Groves

Sywell Leys

off Norton Leys

 

SP 500729

Sywell is a village in the Borough of Wellingborough, Northants

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Sywell has an aerodrome that caters for private flying, flight training and corporate flying. It opened in 1928 and was used in WW2 initially for basic pilot training and later as a repair base for Wellington bombers.

Temple Street

Brown’s Farm Estate, off Hillmorton Road

1879

SP 511747

Dr Frederick Temple DD (1821 - 1902)

Headmaster, Rugby School (1858 - 1869), Archbishop of Canterbury (1896 - 1902).

He was also Bishop of Taunton (1869 - 85) & Bishop of London (1885 - 96). He was the first president (1866 – 1902) of the Rugby Freehold Land Society which was responsible for the development of many residential estates in Rugby from 1866 to 1927. His memorial in Rugby is the Temple Speech Room in Hillmorton Road.

The land upon which Caldecott Street and Temple Street were built, was purchased by The Rugby Freehold Land Society in 1868 from the executors of the late Count Wratislaw.

Tennyson Avenue

off Shakespeare Gardens

1959

SP 492735

Alfred Tennyson (1809 – 92), 1st Baron Tennyson of Aldworth in the County of Sussex.

He was a poet. On the death of Wordsworth in 1850 he was appointed Poet Laureate until his own death in 1892, the longest that any laureate has held this position. Today’s laureates are appointed for a ten year period.

He was buried in the Poets Corner of Westminster Abbey.

Among his works are The Charge of the Light Brigade, Maud, In Memoriam A H H, Locksley Hall and Idylls of the King. Edison recordings of him reading some of his poems are still available.

Many phrases from his poems have passed into the English language as everyday quotations, e.g :-

·      ‘Theirs not to reason why, Theirs but to do and die,’

·      ‘In the Spring a young man’s fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love,’ and

·      ‘For men may come and men may go,

But I go on for ever.’

Thackeray Close

Hillside, off Norton Leys

 

SP 498731

William Makepeace Thackeray (1811 – 63)

He was an author who established a reputation by writing novels that satirised the social values of his day.

There is a memorial bust of him in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

Although in his day he was ranked second only to Charles Dickens, he is today mainly remembered only for his novel Vanity Fair.

Tom Brown Street

Town Centre, off Bath Street

1937

SP 509755

Tom Brown

Fictional hero of 'Tom Brown's Schooldays' by Thomas Hughes (1822 - 96)

This well known book about Rugby School was written in 1857.

Torrance Road (unadopted)

off Lawford Road

1889

SP 495752

Dr David Torrance (1798 - 1874)

He had a medical practice in Rugby from about 1827 having before been a surgeon in the Royal Navy.

He was also the Medical Officer to the Rugby Union and a director of the Rugby Gas Company (1841 -55).

Turner Close

Lower Hillmorton, off Constable Road

1966

SP 536741

Joseph Mallord William Turner RA (1775 - 1851)

English painter.

He was buried in St Paul’s Cathedral, London,

British Romantic landscape painter, water-colourist, and printmaker.

Union Street

Town Centre, within the gyratory system, off Russelsheim Way

It is shown in a map of 1849

SP 501749

The origin of this street name is not known.

Before the gyratory system development, Union Street extended from Warwick Street to just beyond East Union Street

It was built on part of Rugby Field where stood The Butts, an area outside the then town where young men were obliged by statute to practise their archery skills.

Vicarage Road

off Lawford Road

c 1893

SP 499751

St Matthew’s vicarage.

The road was built on part of the St Matthews glebe land behind the original vicarage in Bilton Road.

The land was sold by the church to Rugby Freehold Land Society for 18 building plots.

Warren Road

Hillmorton Paddox Estate, off Percival Road

1925

SP 516742

Robert Edward Warren Hawksley (1874 - 1947)

The road was named by the Rugby Freehold Land Society after Warren Hawksley, an architect and surveyor employed by the Society. He was also secretary of the Rugby Town Hall Company (1910 – 1920)

Warren Hawksley was one of the vendors of the land when the former Brown's Farm, near the Paddox, was developed by the Rugby Freehold Land Society.

Webb Ellis Road

off Bilton Road

1950

SP 495748

William Webb Ellis BA, MA (1807 - 72)

See also 'Biographies' section of this website.

Attended Rugby School (1816 - 25) where, according to Matthew Bloxam, he was originator in 1823 of carrying the ball, the distinctive feature of the Rugby Football game.

Rugby Football Club's premises are in Webb Ellis Road.

Wells Street

off Bath Street

1895

SP 507755

Wells Cathedral, Somerset.

Thomas William Jex-Blake BA, BD & DD (1832 - 1915), headmaster of Rugby School (1874 - 87), became Dean of Wells Cathedral in 1891.

Dr Jex-Blake was an Old Rugbeian, who had also been an assistant master at Rugby (1858 - 68) and Principal of Cheltenham College (1868 - 74).

Wentworth Road

Overslade Estate, off Dunchurch Road

1938

SP 500741

Wentworth Golf Club, Virginia Water, Surrey

The road developers named it after one of their favourite golf courses.

Wentworth Golf Club includes one of Britain's leading golf courses.

Westfield Road

off Bilton Road

1945

SP 497748

Westfield House

The road was built on the 31½ acre estate attached to the large house in Bilton Road.

Among the former owners of the house was Richard Pennington (1799 - 1885), a retired cotton manufacturer and merchant.

Wetherell Way

Brownsover, off Hollowell Way

 1974

SP 515773

Wilfrid Pattison Pat Wetherell (1912-78)

He was an Alderman on Rugby Borough Council (1958-70). He was also chairman of the housing committee when the Council purchased the 214 acre Brownsover Estate from the Boughton-Leigh family.

 In addition to his work as a councillor, he was also a teacher at Elborow Junior School (1948-59), having been acting headmaster from 1957 until the school was closed in 1959.

Whitehall Road

off Clifton Road

1879

SP 508751

Named after Whitehall, an old house that was formerly at the present junction of Clifton Road and Whitehall Road.

Whitehall was probably a 15th century open hall house that by the mid 19th century had become three tenements or cottages

The old building was purchased in 1879 by the Local Board of Health for road widening. Before the widening, Whitehall Road was known as Bridle Lane.

Whittle Close

Bilton, off Bawnmore Road

1964

SP 489731

Sir Frank Whittle OM, KBE, CB, FRS, FRAeS (1907 - 96)

Inventor of the turbojet engine

His first demonstration turbojet engine was manufactured and tested at the BTH factory, Rugby in 1937.

Wilf Brown Close

Brownsover, off Brownsover Lane

2015

SP 511777

Wilfred Frank Brown (1941 – 2004)

Leading Ambulanceman and Technician (1966 – 2001).

Wilf Brown Close was built on the site of the former ambulance station in Brownsover where Wilf Brown was based for the latter part of his career.

William Street

off Railway Terrace

1841

SP 506752

Count William Ferdinand Wratislaw (1788 - 1853)

The street was built on land owned by Count Wratislaw, a solicitor & attorney who resided and practised in Church Street, Rugby.

When this street was first laid out it was about a quarter of its present length and was a cul-de-sac.

Wilson Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cornwallis Road

1990s

SP 482749

Sir Arthur Knyvet Wilson, GCB (1842 - 1921)

Admiral of the Fleet, RN (1907 - 11).

1st Sea Lord (1910 - 11)

Winfield Street

off Clifton Road

1897

SP 514753

Rev Henry Whinfield BA, DD (1726 - 93)

He was the largest landowner to benefit from the enclosure of the Parish of Rugby in 1774.

Winfield Street was built on land that he owned jointly with a “Mr Round”.

Although he was born in Dunchurch, he never lived in Rugby and its surrounds following his matriculation at Peterhouse, Cambridge University in 1846. The street name has always been spelt without the letter "h".

Wise Grove

Abbotts Farm Estate, off McKinnell Crescent

1956

SP 525748

Thomas Arnold Wise MA (1861 - 1940)

He was the charter mayor in 1932. He was also a chairman of Rugby UDC (1903 - 5 & 1923 - 24).

He was also a headmaster of a boys’ preparatory school at Oakfield in Bilton Road.

Wood Street

off Newbold Road

See notes

SP 501760

Frederick Wood (c1807 - 93)

He was a surveyor and land agent who lived and worked in Rugby from about 1840 until 1881. His employment included being assistant chief engineer and Chief Engineer of the Oxford Canal Co (1824 - 53) and as a land agent for the L&NW Railway (1853 - 81). Whilst in Rugby he was also an Inspector and a director of the Rugby Gas & Coke Co. In 1868 he became a founder member of the Institution of Surveyors (now the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors).

This street was built in two phases. The eastern end was constructed 1872 and was extended in 1890 to provide direct access to Newbold Road from the station.

Wooll Street

off Sheep Street

This short passage is of ancient origin, but was not named until 1956.

SP 502751

Dr John Wooll, DD (1767 - 1833)

Headmaster, Rugby School (1807 - 28). During his time as headmaster, the school was entirely rebuilt and its fortunes changed considerably. By 1818 pupil numbers had increased to over 380, making Rugby second only in size to Eton. Pupil numbers then declined progressively to only 123 in 1828.

Why this short passage, with no residences or shops, was named as a street has not been explained.

Wordsworth Road

off Shakespeare Gardens

1959

SP 496733

William Wordsworth (1770 – 1850)

He was one of the major English ‘romantic’ poets and was one of the main figures of a group of poets who lived in the Lake District at the turn of the nineteenth century who were called the Lake Poets. He became the Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom in 1843 following the death of Robert Southey.

He has a memorial in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

Among his major works are Wandered Lonely as a Cloud and The Prelude.

In Grasmere, Cumbria, the Wordsworth Trust maintains Dove Cottage, where he wrote some of his greatest poetry, and the adjoining Wordsworth Museum.

Yates Avenue

Newbold-on-Avon, off Leicester Road

1950

SP 501754

Henry (known as Harry) Yates (1879 - 1929)

In 1913 he became the first Labour member of the Rugby UDC and was its elected chairman from 1924 to 1926.

Mrs Edith Yates, his widow, on July 4th 1929 became the first woman to be elected as a councillor of the Rugby UDC.

He died whilst contesting the 1929 General Election as the local Labour candidate. In the 1911 census his occupation was described as a tripe dresser.