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Roads J - Y

Road Name

Area

 Date

Grid Ref.

Person/ Place

Reason

Notes

Jackson Road

 

Hillmorton, off Coton Road

1962

 

SP 541740

William Jackson (died Nov 1758)

He was the vicar of St John the Baptist from 1747 to 1759, thereby benefitting when enclosure in Hillmorton took place in 1754.

Jackson Road is one of a small group of roads in Hillmorton that were named after former vicars of St John the Baptist.

James Street

Town Centre, off Albert Street

1851

SP 505758

James Richardson (25 Aug 1827 - 31 Aug 1827)

His mother, Mrs Anne Richardson (1791 - 1861) owned the land on which the street was made.

She inherited considerable land in 1828 on the death of her husband, James Richardson snr.  James jun. was her youngest son. See also Albert Street.

Jenkins Road

 

Hillmorton, off Featherbed Lane

1961

 

SP 531743

 

William Henry Jenkins (1874-1956) ~ He was usually referred to as W H Jenkins.

 

He had been the vicar of St John the Baptist from 1919 to 1927.

During his time at Hillmorton he had also been for three years a representative on the Rugby Board of Guardians and on Rugby RDC.

Jenkins Road is one of a small group of roads in Hillmorton that were named after former vicars of St John the Baptist.

After Hillmorton and then 13 years as vicar of Granby, Notts, he was appointed in 1940 as Rector of Yelvertoft, Northants until his retirement in 1953 to Barnstone Manor, nr Nottingham.

Johnson Avenue

 

New Bilton, off Addison Road.

 

1920

 

SP 489748

 

James Johnson (1850-1923)

 

He was elected to the Rugby Rural District Council 1n 1894 and was its chairman from 1907 until he retired in 1922.

He was of independent means who had taken up farming as a hobby.

 

John Thwaites Close

off Russelsheim Way Firs Drive

1981

SP 500748

John A Thwaites (1931 - 79)

He was the first Chief Executive of Rugby Borough Council following its re-organisation in 1974.

He moved to Rugby in 1970 as deputy town clerk. He died in a road accident.

Joyce Way

Cawston, off Stonehall Road

2002

SP 474739

Joyce Boughton (d. 1678)

Joyce was the wife of Edward Boughton (d. 1642), grandson of the Edward Boughton (d. 1589) who built Cawston Hall about 1585.

Ownership of Cawston Hall appeared to have descended by inheritance to Joyce’s husband, Edward, and then to their son, William, who was baptised in 1623 and died in 1663.

Jubilee Street

 

New Bilton, off Lawford Road

 

1900

 

SP 498754

 

The Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria.

 

The sixtieth anniversary of Queen Victoria's reign in 1897 was widely celebrated.

Due to the length of her reign, Queen Victoria is frequently commemorated by the naming of streets.

Judith Way

Cawston, off Stonehall Road

2002

SP 473739

Judith Boughton (bapt 1713)

Judith was one of the co-heirs of Edward Boughton of Lawford (d. 1739), who in 1707 had inherited the Manor of Cawston from Francis Boughton (1642-1707).

Judith inherited that part of the Manor which contained Cawston Hall and probably sold it to John, 2nd Duke of Montagu (1st creation) and known as John the Planter (1690-1749), about 1744.

Juliet Drive

 

Bilton, Woodlands Estate, off Alwyn Road

 

1967

SP 485725

 

Juliet Capulet

 

She is one of the central characters in Romeo and Juliet, a tragedy written by William Shakespeare (1564-1616) in about 1595. (see also Capulet Close.)

 

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names "having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare's birth" in 1564. There is also a Juliet who has a smaller role in Measure for Measure, as the wife of Claudio.

Kalfs Drive

Cawston, off Gold Avenue

2004

SP 476735

Kalf is believed to have been the Saxon farmer after whom Calvestone was originally named. 

see also Calvestone Road

 

Kay Close

 

Brownsover, off Stonehills

 

1972

SP 513772

 

Herbert Samuel Kay (1878-1966) MBE

 

He was headmaster of Long Lawford County School (1906-39). He received his MBE for services to the National Savings movement. He had also been chairman of the Rugby Divisional Education Executive.

Kay Close is one of a small group of roads In Brownsover that were named after former head teachers in the Borough.

When St Matthews Senior School closed in the early 1960s, it moved to a new school in Lawford Lane, Bilton, the Herbert Kay High School for Boys. Following its merger with the adjoining Westland Girls Secondary School in 1977, it became known as Bilton School.

Kennedy Drive

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cornwallis Road

1990s

SP 482749

Sir William Robert  Kennedy, GCB,  (1838 - 1916)

Admiral, RN (1901)

He was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the East Indies in 1892 and Commander-in-Chief, The Nore in 1900.

Keppel Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Frobisher Road

1961

SP 482744

Augustus Keppel, 1st Viscount Keppel (1725 - 86)

Vice Admiral, RN (1770 - 79)

He was with Anson on his renowned voyage around the world. He was 1st Lord of the Admiralty (1782 - 83). HMS Keppel, a RN destroyer named after Viscount Keppel, was adopted by the town of Rugby during WW2.

Keswick Drive

 

Brownsover, off Newton Manor Lane

 

1994

SP 514776

 

Keswick, Cumbria

 

Keswick is a market town, just north of Derwentwater and about 4 miles from Bassenthwaite. In the 2011 Census it had a population of 4,821.

 

Keswick Drive is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Keswick was associated with the poets Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Robert Southey who wrote about the scenic beauty of the area.

Keyes Drive

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cornwallis Road

1990s

SP 483749

Roger John Brownlow Keyes, 1st Baron Keyes (1872 - 1945)

Admiral of the Fleet, RN (1930 - 31)

Became Director of Operations, 1940 to 1941.

Kilworth Road

 

Hillmorton, off Bucknill Crescent

 

1938

SP 536734

 

John Killworth (1832-1926)

 

John Killworth was a member of the Rugby RDC (1898-1919) and the Rugby Board of Guardians (1898-1926) He had also been a parish councillor and a trustee of the Little Church Close Charity.

 

He worked for 32 years as a blacksmith ffor the Oxford Canal Company. He then purchased a small farm and in his later life, assisted his wife with their grocer's shop.

Although the name of the road is spelt as 'Kilworth' suggesting it was named after the villages in South Leicestershire, it is believed this spelling to be an error as several of the roads in that part of Hillmorton have been named after prominent local individuals.

Kimberley Road

 

off Wood Street

 

1902

 

SP 507759

 

Kimberley, Northern Cape Province, South Africa

 

Originally a major diamond mining town, Kimberley was beseiged by the Boers from October 14, 1899 during the second Boer War until it was relieved by the Cavalry of Major General John French (1852-1925) on February 15, 1900.

Kimberley Road was built on land formerly part of the parish glebe.

Today, Kimberley City is the seat of the Northern Cape Provincial Legislature and Administration.

 

King Edward Road

off Wood Street

1904

SP 506758

King Edward VII (1841-1910)

 

He was the reigning monarch (1901-10) at the time the road was opened.

 

In 1904 King Edward Road was laid out between Wood Street and Manor Road on land purchased by the Rugby Land Society from the Lodge Estate. It was later extended to Albert Street.

Kingsley Avenue

Hillmorton, off Hillmorton Road

1930

SP 525740

Kingsley Avenue, Daventry.

The developer of this small estate, William Henry Adams (1874-1934), named this road after the road in Daventry where he lived before coming to Rugby.

This information was provided by Cedric Thomas Adams, the son of the developer, in his letter to the Rugby Advertiser dated 11 August 1983.

Kirkby Road

Hillmorton, off Millfields Avenue

1940

SP 526740

Adeliza Adams, née Kirkby (1870-1953)

The developer of this small estate, William Henry Adams (1874-1934), named this road after the maiden name of his wife,

This information was provided by Cedric Thomas Adams, the son of the developer, in his letter to the Rugby Advertiser dated 11 August 1983.

Kirkby Close

 

Brownsover, off Charwelton Drive

 

1993

SP 520768

 

Kirkby-in-Furness, Cumbria

 

Kirkby-in-Furness is a village about 5 km south of Broughton in Furness and about 8 km northwest of Ulverston.

It is part of the civil parish of Kirkby Ireleth and is just within the border of the Lake District National Park.

Kirkby Close is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

The population of the civil parish at the 2011 Census was 1,174.

 

Kirkstone

 

Brownsover, off Ambleside

1980

SP 518773

 

Kirkstone Pass, Cumbria.

 

Kirkstone Pass is a mountain pass at an altitude of 1,489 feet (454 m). It connects Ambleside in the Rothay valley to Patterdale in the Ullswater valley. It is the highest pass in the Lake District.

Kirkstone is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Near the summit of the pass is the Kirkstone Pass Inn, the third highest public house in England

Landseer Close

Lower Hillmorton, off Constable Road

1966

SP 537740

Sir Edwin Henry Landseer RA (1802 – 73)

English painter and sculptor

Well known for his paintings of animals—particularly horses, dogs and stags. Best known as the sculptor of the lions in Trafalgar Square, London.

Langdale Close

 

Brownsover, off Foxons Barn Road

 

1973

SP 514770

 

Great Langdale valley, Cumbria

 

Great Langdale valley, usually known simply as Langdale, stretches from Ambleside through Elterwater to the National Trust owned Dungeon Ghyll Hotel. It is a popular location for outdoor enthusiasts who are attracted by the many fells around the head of the valley.

 

Langdale Close is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

There is also an adjoining valley known as Little Langdale.

The highest fell in Langdale is Bow Fell that reaches a height of 2,960 feet (see also Bow Fell). On the northern side of Langdale are also a group of peaks known as the Langdale Pikes, several of which reach a height of over 2,200 feet.

Langton Road

 

off Hillmorton Road

 

1920

SP 520741

 

John Allibone Langton (1842 - 1918)

 

John Allibone Langton was a landed gentleman whose properties included a farm of about 105 acres between Rugby and Hillmorton. Langton Road was laid out by the Rugby Land Society on part of the farm..

He made several donations to charity in his will, including £1000 each to St John's Church, Hillmorton, and St Cross Hospital. In 1876 he changed his name by deed from John Allibone to John Allibone Langton. Langton was the maiden name of his deceased mother, Mary.

Lawford Road

off Corporation Street

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 500750

This is on the route of the ancient track that joined Rugby and Church Lawford.

It was part of a longer track that ran parallel with the River Avon from the Fosse Way to Watling Street.

In the Domesday Book, Church Lawford is referred to as ‘Leileforde’. The meaning of this Old English name is probably ‘ford of  a man called Lealla (Leile)’.

This road attained prominence about 1870 with the establishment of the cement works and the subsequent development of New Bilton.

Lawrence Road

 

off Eastlands Road

 

1926

SP 516752

 

Lawrence Sheriff (c1515 - 67)
see also 'Biographies' section of this website.

He founded Rugby School in 1567.

It is presumed that this road is another reminder of this famous Rugbeian. (see also Lawrence Sheriff Street.)

Lawrence Sheriff Street

Town Centre, off Warwick Street

See ‘notes’ column

SP 502750

Lawrence Sheriff (c1515 - 67)

see also 'Biographies' section of this website.

He founded Rugby School in 1567 which now stands on Lawrence Sheriff Street.

In the 19th century this street was described as the "King's Highway"; it later was known as School Street before being given its present name in the mid 19th century.

Unusually, it has no street name signs, so it is unclear to the casual observer that Lawrence Sheriff Street extends from Drury Lane to Little Church Street.

Lea Crescent

Newbold, off Parkfield Road

1951

SP 482764

Reginald Stephen Lea MA (1846 - 1925)

In 1904 he donated to the town its first purpose built, horse drawn ambulance. It was named the 'Mary Wood' ambulance after his childhood nurse.

He was headmaster (1876 - 86) of the Oakfield Preparatory School in Bilton Road & a lieutenant in the Rugby Volunteer Fire Brigade.

Lennon Close

 

Hillmorton, off Crick Road

 

1975

 

SP 545734

 

Ernest Patrick Lennon (1889-1965)

 

He had been a member of the Borough Council from 1938 to 1961.

He was also the head of Lennon Bros. Ltd, a local firm of wholesale tobacco distributors.

Lestock Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cornwallis Road

1961

SP 490746

Richard Lestock, (1679 - 1746)

Admiral, RN (1796)

Richard Lestock was involved in the defeat of the RN at the Battle of Toulon (1744).

Lever Road

 

Hillmorton. off Coton Road

 

1963

 

SP 538741

 

Robert Lever MA (1849-1929)

 

Robert Lever was the vicar of St John the Baptist from 1889 to 1919.

He had been also at one time a member of Rugby RDC and Hillmorton Parish Council.

Lever Road is one of a small group of roads in Hillmorton that were named after former vicars of St John the Baptist.

Lindale

 

Brownsover, off Hollowell Way

 

1977

SP 516775

 

Lindale village, Cumbria

 

Lindale is traditionally known as Lindale in Cartmel. It is located in the civil parish of Allithwaite Upper in the South Lakeland district of the Lake District, and lies north of Grange-over-Sands on the north eastern edge of Morecambe Bay.

 

Lindale is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Lindale's most famous resident was John "Iron-Mad" Wilkinson (1728-1808), an ironmaster and industrialist. In the late 1770s he bought Castlehead Hill at Lindale where he built a mansion and improved 1,000 acres of nearly worthless moss land so that crops could be grown. He was buried at Castlehead where a cast iron obelisk still stands in his memory.

Linnell Road

Hillmorton, Abbott's Farm Estate, off Lower Hillmorton Road

1956

SP 528744

William Henry Linnell (1850 - 1928)

He was chairman of Rugby UDC (1907 - 09)

His occupation was a builder.

Little Church Street

Town centre, off Lawrence Sheriff Street

See ‘notes’ column

SP 504750

St Andrew's Church

This street gave direct access to the parish church from the Hillmorton Road & Barby Road

The street features in a plan of 15th century Rugby, when it was known as 'Old Town Street'.

Little Elborow Street

off Corporation Street

1835

SP 501751

Richard Elborowe jun (c1645 - 1707)

Local benefactor & Freeman of City of London who founded in Rugby the Elborow charity school & almshouses.

The site of this street was owned in the 17th cen by Richard Elborowe and in the early 19th cen by Dr R R Bloxam (1765-1840), an assistant master at Rugby School (1791-1827), who sold it for residential development.

Little Pennington Street

off Plowman Street

1835 – 1845

SP 498751

This street is reputedly named after Mrs Rebecca Pennington.

In 1748 she sold to Rugby School the Old Mansion House and adjoining land that became the site of the present School House.

The house had previously been purchased about 1720 by Mrs Pennington’s father, Henry Plowman of Northampton, from the Burnaby family who had been Lords of the Manor of Rugby from 1594 to 1720.

Liza Court

 

Brownsover, off Ennerdale

 

1987

SP 514775

 

River Liza, Cumbria

 

The Liza is a Lake District river that flows from its source on Great Gable through Ennerdale valley into Ennerdale Water.

Liza Court is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Lodge Road

 

off Manor Road

 

1903

 

SP 505757

 

The Lodge

The Lodge was a house situated in what is now Caldecott Park and was the home of the last Lord of the Manor of Rugby, Thomas Caldecott (1798-1875). It had been built about 1720 by the Boughton family, when the former Manor House in Lawrence Sheriff Street was sold to Henry Plowman of Northampton (see also Plowman Street).

Lodge Road was laid out by The Rugby Land Society on the part of the Lodge Estate that they purchased from the Miss Harris sisters, two grand-daughters of Thomas Caldecott by his daughter, Ellen Harris (1832-62).

Loverock Crescent

Hillmorton, Abbott's Farm Estate, off Lower Hillmorton Road

1956

SP 524745

Lewis Loverock (1858 - 1932)

He was a chairman of the Rugby UDC (1912 - 14 & 1921 - 23). He was also an Alderman of the Warwickshire County Council (1923 – 1932). At his death he was the Deputy Charter Mayor of Rugby and had been offered the position of first Mayor of Rugby.

His occupation was a draper. At his death he was chairman of Rugby Gas Company and was also a governor of Lawrence Sheriff School.

His father was George Loverock (1832 - 98), also a draper and a member of the UDC.

Lower Hillmorton Road

off Clifton Road

 

SP 509751

It was one of two historic routes between Rugby and the village of Hillmorton

The road led to the low lying Domesday village of Moreton.

In medieval times Moreton became known as Hillmorton when it was merged with the hamlet or village of Hulle that had grown up on the higher land to the south of Moreton.

(see also Hillmorton Road.)

Lytham Road

 

Bilton, off Bilton Road

 

1938

SP 489744

 

Royal Lytham & St Annes Golf Club, Lytham St Annes, Lancashire.

 

This road was named after one of their favourite golf courses by the builder, David Mitchell and his associates.

(see also St Annes Road)

The Royal Lytham & St Annes Golf Club was founded in 1886 and the present course constructed in 1897. It is one of the world's premier links courses, having hosted many major tournaments including eleven open championships.

Macaulay Road

off Shakespeare Gardens

1959

SP 494734

Thomas Babington Macaulay, (1800 – 59), Baron Macaulay of Rothley, Leicestershire.

See also ‘Notes’ section.

He was a historian, essayist and poet. He was also a Whig politician who became a Member of Parliament for most of 1830 – 1856. During that time he held office as Secretary of War (1839 – 41) and Paymaster-General (1846 – 48).

Possibly best known for his “History of England from the accession of James II”. The fifth and last volume, taking it to the death of William II in 1702, was completed and published posthumously by his sister.

He is buried in the Poets Corner of Westminster Abbey.

Alternatively Macaulay Road was named after Dame (Emilie) Rose Macaulay DBE (1881 – 1958), novelist. She was born in Rugby, the second of the seven children of George Campbell Macaulay (1852–1915), assistant master at Rugby School. Among her Macaulay antecedents was Thomas B. Macaulay, a first cousin of her paternal grandfather. Her family moved from Rugby in 1887.

She was made a DBE in 1958.

Macbeth Close

 

Bilton, Woodlands Estate, off Cymbeline Way

 

1966

SP 492726

 

Macbeth

 

Macbeth is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare (1564-1616) in about 1606. In it Macbeth murders Duncan the King of Scotland and takes the throne himself.

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names "having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare's birth" in 1564.

 

Madden Place

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cornwallis Road

1990s

SP 483749

Sir Charles Edward Madden, 1st Baronet, (1862 - 1935)

Admiral of the Fleet, RN (1924 - 30)

His son was also an admiral in the RN.

Magnet Lane

Bilton, off Main Street

1921

SP 482736

‘The Magnet’ coffee room.

The Magnet coffee room had been set up in Bilton in 1875 by the Reverend Richard Orme Assheton MA (1836 – 1909), a noted member of the temperance movement, in an attempt to ‘draw’ working men away from the public houses of the village.

The Reverend Richard Orme Assheton was the Rector of St Mark’s Church, Bilton, (1862 – 95).

Manor Road

 

off Park Road

 

1903

 

SP 504758

 

Thomas Caldecott 1798-1875)

 

Manor Road was so named because it was built on the former Lodge Estate, the home of Thomas Caldecott, the last Lord of the Manor of Rugby (1826-1875).

 

Manor Road was laid out by The Rugby Land Society on the part of the Lodge Estate that they purchased from the Miss Harris sisters, two grand-daughters of Thomas Caldecott by his daughter, Ellen Harris (1832-62).

Maple Grove

off Lancaster Road

c 1915

SP 503758

The maple tree (Genus: Acer)

It is said to have been named so because the pavement was originally lined with Maple trees

See also Acacia, Poplar & Sycamore Groves.

Market Place

Town centre

See ‘notes’ column

SP 503752

Street market

This is at the historic centre of the town. Street markets were held in Market Place until April 1953, when they were moved to Church Street.

Prior to the end of the 17th cen. a market cross stood near to the site of the present clock tower and the site was known The Cross.

Market Street

Between Railway Terrace and Bath Street.

c 1903

SP 508755

Rugby Cattle Market

Believed to be so named because of its proximity to the then site of the cattle market.  (See also the entry for Sheep Street).

The cattle market was moved to a site near to the railway station when the lease on Reynolds Field expired in 1878. The market remained there until May 2008 when it was closed and the business moved to Stoneleigh Park near Leamington.

Matlock Close

 

Brownsover, off Stonehills

 

1975

SP 511770

 

Matlock, Derbyshire.

 

Matlock is the county town of Derbyshire. It is nine miles south west of Chesterfield.

Matlock is just outside the south eastern boundary of the Peak District National Park. The civil parish of Matlock Town had a population of 9,543 in the 2011 Census.

McKinnell Crescent

Hillmorton, Abbott's Farm Estate, off Loverock Crescent

1965

SP 534745

James Jesse McKinnell CBE (1869 - 1950)

JP for Warwickshire; Chairman of Rugby UDC (1914 - 19); County Councillor (1917 - 21); Mayor of Rugby (1932 - 34)

He was born In Rugby and had a grocery shop at 27 Sheep Street, Rugby, until his retirement about 1927.

Merttens Drive

Rugby, off Bilton Road

1964

SP 499749

Fredrick Merttens (1849-1935)

He was a philanthropist and active promoter of Adult Education. He presented the Merttens’ Playing Field in Bilton Road to Warwickshire County Council for the use of local children. When the drive leading to the playing field was later made up by the County Council after the building of Brooke School, it was named after Mr Merttens.

Frederick Merttens was born in Germany. He established in Manchester a successful export business in textiles. Having earlier retired from business through ill-health, he came to Rugby in 1905. He took an active part in the affairs of the town, including being a Justice of the Peace for Warwickshire, and a member of the Board of Management of St Cross Hospital.

Millbeck

 

Brownsover, off Dunnerdale

 

1984

 

SP 517774

 

Millbeck, Cumbria

 

Millbeck, by the slopes of Skiddaw, is a small hamlet about 3 miles north of Keswick, between Bassenthwaite Lake and Derwent Water

Millbeck is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

 

Millers Dale Close

 

Brownsover, off Hollowell Way

 

1975

SP 551773

 

Millers Dale, Derbyshire

 

Millers Dale is a valley in Derbyshire’s River Wye. It is a popular beauty spot about 1½ miles south of the town of Tideswell.

 

Millers Dale Close is one of the roads in Brownsover that has been named after places or features in the Peak District of Derbyshire.

Features of Millers Dale are the former Midland Railway viaducts and tunnels which now form part of the Monsal Trail for walkers and cyclists.

Millfields Avenue

Hillmorton, off Kingsley Avenue

1931

SP 520740

Hillmorton Windmill

The name Millfields was derived by the developer, William Henry Adams, from the windmill that formerly stood on the nearby mound in the Hillmorton Recreation Ground.

This information was provided by Cedric Thomas Adams, the son of the developer, in his letter to the Rugby Advertiser dated 11 August 1983.

Mill Road

off Murray Road

 

 

Brownsover watermill

 

Mill Road led to the water mill

 

It originally ran north from Craven Road to the mill and was known until about1901 as Brownsover Mill Road. When a through connection with Murray Road was established in about 1905, the part south of the station became known as Murray Road.

Monks Close

Cawston, off Calvestone Road

2004

SP 475735

The monks of Pipewell Abbey.

The monks of Pipewell, a Cistercian abbey near Kettering in Northamptonshire possessed several granges in the vicinity of Dunchurch, with Cawston being the most valuable

Pipewell Abbey was established in 1143 by William Butevilain.

Montague Road

 

Bilton, Woodlands Estate, off Juliet Drive

1968

SP 485725

 

The Montague family of Verona, Italy.

 

"Romeo and Juliet" is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare (1564-1616) about 1595. In it Romeo, a Montague, is one of the two lovers whose death reconciles the Capulets with their sworn enemies the Montagues. (see also Capulet Close.)

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names "having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare's birth" in 1564.

 

Montgomery Drive

Bilton, off Nelson Way

1949

SP 481740

Bernard Law Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein, KGGCBDSOPC (1887 – 1976)

He served in the British Army from 1908 to 1958. He followed his success in defeating Rommel’s Panzer Corps in North Africa by being one of the outstanding Allied commanders in World War II and was appointed Field Marshal in 1944.

He commenced his career with the Ist Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment with whom he served in France in the WW1 until he was injured. Among his other appointments between the world wars was as Company Commander of the Regiment.

Following WWII, his commands included being Chief of the Imperial General Staff (1946 – 1948) and Deputy Supreme Commander, Europe, of NATO (1951–58).

Montrose Road

Rokeby Estate, off Kingsway

1938

SP 501740

The reason behind this street name is not known uncertain.

As the names chosen for most of the roads on the Rokeby Estate have clear associations with the family of R H Wood who owned the land on which the roads were built, ‘Montrose’ probably also has a family connection.

It has been speculated that ‘Montrose’ is a combination of the ‘Mont’ in Belmont Road and the ‘Rose’ in Rosewood Avenue (qv).

Morson Crescent

Hillmorton, Abbott's Farm Estate, off Loverock Crescent

1956

SP 524748

Arthur Morson (1859 - 1931)

He was chairman of the Rugby UDC (1905 - 07); he later became clerk to the UDC (1907 - 27).

 

Mosedale

 

Brownsover, off Junewood Close

 

1988

 

SP 520773

 

Mosedale, Cumbria

 

Mosedale is a hamlet in the north of the Lake District National Park. It is on the River Caldew, about one mile north of Mungrisdale.

 

Mosedale is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Mosedale, together with seven other hamlets, is part of the civil parish of Mungrisdale which in the 2001 Census had a poulation of 284.

Moultrie Road

Town Centre, off Clifton Road

c1901

SP 507751

Rev John Moultrie (1799 - 1874)

Rector of St Andrews, Rugby (1825 - 1874). Also a poet & hymn writer.

He died of smallpox that he caught whilst ministering to patients at the isolation hospital in Barby Road.

Moyeady Avenue

 

Hillmorton, Paddox Estate, off Dunsmore Avenue

c 1915

 

SP 524738

 

Moyeady, Co. Wexford, Ireland

 

It is said that the birthplace of the developer of this road was Moyeady, although this cannot be confirmed.

 

Moyeady is a townland, the smallest administrative division of land in Ireland, in the parish of Marshalstown.

The individual building plots in Moyeady Avenue were sold at an auction of the Paddox estate in 1912.

Murray Road

Town Centre, off Clifton Road

1898

SP 508751

John Murray MA (1828 - 99)

Rector of St Andrews, Rugby (1875 - 98)

He sold about 18 acres of glebe land over which Murray Road now passes.

When first built, Murray Road only extended north from Clifton Road to Wells Street. At that time the present section of road between Craven Road and the railway was known as Brownsover Mill Road. (see also Mill Road). In about 1905, Murray Road was extended to Craven Road to make a throughway to the railway. The section of Mill Road south of the railway  was also renamed as Murray Road

Murrayian Close

off Murray Road

1983

SP 508752

St Andrew's Murray School (1882 - 1965)

This close was built on the site of the former school.

The close was named at the request of the Old Murrayian Association, the former pupils of Murray School.

Myers Road

Hillmorton, Low Hills Estate, off Packwood Road

1961

SP 539738

Richard Henry Myers JP (1866 - 1943)

Mayor of Rugby (1938 - 40). He was elected to the Rugby UDC in 1929, and was one of the first aldermen (1932-1943) of the new Rugby Borough Council.

He was also a member of the County Council (1931-43)

He was headmaster of St Matthew’s Boys School (1891-1926).

He was a Justice of the Peace (1928-43).

He held many positions, too many to list here, in local government and voluntary organisations.

Naseby Road

off Cromwell Road

1932

SP 511744

William Naseby (1816 - 1907)

He lived in Hillmorton Road near the present entrance to Cromwell Road. His cottage was known as Naseby House.

He was a market gardener.

Nelson Way

Bilton, off Lawford Lane

1949

SP 481740

George Horatio Nelson, 1st Baron Nelson of Stafford (1887 - 1962)

Chairman of English Electric (1930 - 1962). He was knighted in 1943, created a baronet in 1955 and received his peerage in 1960.

243 homes in Nelson Way and the adjoining roads were built after WW2 by English Electric for key employees. When they were first built, the area was known as the Kingsway Estate after the English Electric head office in London, Kingsway House.

Newbold Road

Town centre, off Corporation Street

see Notes column

SP 501755

Newbold on Avon village.

This was the route of the historic road to Newbold-on-Avon, a continuation of North Street.

It was part of the Rugby & Lutterworth Turnpike (1785 - 1878). In the 1841 census it was known as Mill Street, but by the end of that decade it had been given its present name.

Noble Drive

Cawston, off Clement Way

2002

SP 473735

The Peerage of England

Members of the peerage had from time to time owned Cawston.

Among the nobility who possessed Cawston was Turchil, the Saxon Earl of Warwick, who is listed in the Domesday Book of 1086 as the owner. Another prominent peer to own the Cawston Estate  was John, second Duke of Montagu, who purchased it about 1744.

Norman Road

 

Newbold, off Yates Avenue

 

1952

SP 497767

 

Thomas Goodman Norman (1846-1927)

 

He was a member of the Rugby Rural District Council for 44 years and was chairman of the Rugby Rural District Council (1901-07).

In 1911 he was described as a grazier and was living in Newbold on Avon.

Apparently he did not believe in "new-fangled notions" and did not alter his clocks when daylight was introduced.

Northcote Road

 

off Lawford Road

 

1913

SP 497751

 

Northcote House

 

The Rugby Land Society planned and laid out Northcote Road as part of their small Lawford Road estate.

 

As Northcote House was a large residence on the east side of Newbold Road, some distance away from Northcote Road, it is unclear why The Rugby Land Society used this name.

North Street

Town Centre, off Market Place

see Notes column

SP 503752

 

An ancient road that led to the north of the town centre.

It was part of the Rugby & Lutterworth Turnpike (1785 - 1878). In the 1841 census it was known as Mill Street, but by the end of that decade it was given its present name.

Norton Leys

off Goldsmith Avenue

1964

SP 497730

The village of Norton, about two miles east of Daventry, Northants.

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

The Old English meaning of the name, Norton, was ‘north farmstead’.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Near to Norton, on Watling Street, is the Roman settlement of Bannaventa.

Oakfield Road

off Westfield Road

1938

SP 496746

Oakfield House, a house on the opposite side of Bilton Road was later used as a preparatory school.

The road was built on the 31½ acre estate attached to Westfield House in Bilton Road.

Oakfield Preparatory School for Boys existed from the middle of the 19th cen. to the 1920s. The house then became a private club and is now commercial offices.

Oberon Close

 

Bilton, Woodlands Estate, off Cymbeline Way

1968

SP 486728

 

Oberon

 

Oberon is the King of the Fairies in a Midsummers Night Dream, a comedy written by William Shakespeare (1564-1616) in 1595/96.

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names "having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare's birth" in 1564.

Old Farm Close

Cawston, off Calvestone Road

2007

SP 477741

Cawston Old Farm

The Close together with much of the Cawston Grange development was built upon the lands of the former Cawston Old Farm.

 

Omega Place

off Railway Terrace

1994

SP 508757

Omega Lamp Works

Site of the old BTH Lamp Works, when purchased in 1926. Building demolished in 1994 to make way for sheltered housing known as Omega Place.

The building previously was a skating rink; later, until 1984, it was known as the “Omega Lamp Works”.

Orlando Close

 

Bilton, Woodlands Estate, off Wolsey Road

 

1967

SP 488726

 

Orlando

 

Orlando is a character in the romantic comedy, As You Like It, which was written by William Shakespeare (1564-1616) in about 1599. Orlando is in love with, and eventually marries, Rosalind the heroine of the play..

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names "having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare's birth" in 1564.

 

Orson Leys

off Dunchurch Road

1964

 

SP 498733

The origin of this name is not known.

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

As all of the other Rugby ‘Leys’ are associated with communities in Northants, it is a possibility that this name should have been ‘Orton’, a village near to Rothwell, Northants.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

The Orton Trust run short courses in Stone Masonry and Stone Carving in a converted medieval church at Orton.

Othello Close

 

Bilton, Woodlands Estate, off Montague Road.

1968

SP 486723

 

Othello, The Moor of Venice

 

Othello is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare (1564-1616) about 1603. He was a Moorish general in the Venetian army.

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names "having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare's birth" in 1564.

Oval Road

Hillmorton Paddox Estate, off Sidney Road

1926

SP 518539

 

The Rugby Freehold Land Society named this road on account of its shape.

Oval Road was built on Brown's Farm Estate, near the Paddox when it was developed by the Rugby Freehold Land Society.

Overslade Lane

 

off Dunchurch Road

 

1930

 

SP 499739

 

Overslade, Bilton

 

Overslade is an area in the north of the parish of Bilton near to the former Westfield House estate.

The origin of the name ‘Overslade’ has not been established.

This lane was originally known as Featherbed Lane, presumably after the nearby Featherbed Farm. Its name was changed about 1930.

 

Oxford Street

off Clifton Road

1877

SP 511751

 

The reason behind this street name is not known.

As Cambridge Street was built about the same time as Oxford Street, it is presumed that both were named after the famous University towns.

Most clergy of the established church at that time obtained their degree at either Cambridge or Oxford University.

The Old English meaning of Oxford is ‘ford used by oxen).

Packwood Avenue

Hillmorton, Low Hills Estate, off Mellor Road

1961

SP 539738

Sidney Packwood Smart  (1883-1955)

Mayor of Rugby (1943 – 44) and served on the borough council from 1932 – 52.

His occupation was a railway signalman.

Pantolf Place

 

Newbold on Avon, off Brownsover Road

 

 

SP 492772

 

William Pantolf (d. c1245)

 

William Pantolf was lord of the manor of Newbold on Avon, having inherited it from his father, Roger Pantolf. On his death his manor house, 3 caracutes of land and fishing rights in the Avon were left to the Priory of Monks Kirby.

As William Pantolf died without issue, the residue of his effects was divided between his co-heirs, his sisters Emma de Waver and Burga de Bending.

At the time of Pantolf the manor sometimes known as Newbold Pantolf, or Newbold Paunton.

Paradise Street

off Clifton Road

1870

SP 511751

not known

This street received its name at the request of Theodore Marc Wratislaw (1831 - 1919), who as solicitor to the Freehold Land Society negotiated the purchase of the land from the executors of Mr Highton, the late owner of the land.

It may have been so named because it backs upon the Clifton Road cemetery.

Park Road

 

off North Street

 

1903

 

SP 502764

 

Caldecott Park

 

This road was erected on the former Lodge Estate at the same time as Caldecott Park. The southern section of the road adjoins the south east side of the park.

 

The Lodge Estate was the former home of the last Lord of the Manor of Rugby, Thomas Caldecott (1798-1875). The Misses Harris, his grand-daughters by his daughter, Ellen, sold part of the Estate to the Urban District Council to provide a park and sold the remaining part for development, mainly for residential purposes.

Parnell Close

off Oliver Street

1977

SP 498752

J Parnell & Son.

Parnell Close was built on land formerly occupied by this prestigious building and construction firm.

Parnell’s carried out much construction work for Edwin Lutyens, the famous architect. The founder of this firm was William Parnell (1791-1864). On his death his son, John (1816-85), took over the business, which became J Parnell & Son. It was acquired in 1968 by the construction firm, Miller Buckley.

Patterdale

 

Brownsover, off Hollowell Way

 

1977

SP 516774

 

Patterdale Village, Cumbria.

 

Patterdale is a small village in the Patterdale valley, also known as the Ullswater valley. Its population in the 2011 Census was 501.

 

Patterdale is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Patterdale is the start point for a number of popular hill walks including the Striding Edge path up to Helvellyn.

Pendred Road

New Bilton, off Addison Road

1921

SP 490750

John William Pendred (1871 - 1934)

He was clerk to the Rugby and Crick Rural District Councils (1895 - 1934)

He was also clerk to the Rugby Board of Guardians for 29 years.

Pennington Street

off Plowman Street

c1835

SP 499751

This street is reputedly named after Mrs Rebecca Pennington.

 In 1748 she sold to Rugby School the Old Mansion House and adjoining land that became the site of the present School House.

The Old Mansion House had previously been purchased about 1720 by Mrs Pennington’s father, Henry Plowman of Northampton, from the Burnaby family who had been Lords of the Manor of Rugby from 1594 to 1720.

The Pennington family of Westfield House, Rugby, came to Rugby in 1858, much later than the naming of Pennington Street. No relationship between them and Mrs Rebecca Pennington has been established.

Percival Road

Hillmorton Paddox Estate, off Hillmorton Road

1924

SP 519743

Dr John Percival MA (1834 - 1918)

Dr Percival was a headmaster of Rugby School (1887 – 95), later becoming Bishop of Hereford (1895 – 1917). The road was named by the Rugby Freehold Land Society, its developer.

Matthew Bloxam’s former home was purchased for a memorial to Dr Percival with subscriptions from Old Rugbeians. It became The Percival Guildhouse, an Adult Education Centre.

Pettiver Crescent

Hillmorton, off Featherbed Lane

1954

SP 531740

James Pettiver, FRS, (c1663 – 1718)

An apothecary & celebrated naturalist and botanist. He was born in Hillmorton.

He was a nephew of Richard Elborowe, junior. His collection of specimens was purchased by Sir Hans Sloane, PRS, (1660 – 1753), a collector of natural history objects and other curiosities which in 1759 became exhibits in the newly founded British Museum and later in the Natural History Museum.

Phipps Avenue

Abbotts Farm Estate, off Bromwich Road

1956

SP 528541

Henry Thomas Purdie Phipps (1896 - 1953)

He was a member of the borough council from 1943 to 1953. He was appointed as a Warwickshire JP in 1952

His occupation was an engineering estimator at the BTH. He had been President of the Warwickshire County AAA in 1938 & President of the English Cross Country Union in 1948.

Pinders Lane

Off Albert Street

pre 1837

SP 507756

The reason behind the naming of this ancient lane is obscure.

A pinder was an officer of a manor who was authorised to impound stray animals.

Pinder is a common surname throughout the parish records for Rugby and it is probable that the lane was named after one of these inhabitants.

There is no record of there ever having been an animal pound in this part of the town.

Pinders Lane features in the 1851 census returns. However it is said that the original name of the upper part was East Leyes.

Pinders Lane was reduced to its present length during the redevelopment of the James Street/ Railway Terrace area in the 1980s. Formerly the upper part continued through that area from Albert Street to Castle Street. (see also Charles Warren Close).

Pinfold Street

New Bilton, off Lawford Road

c1881

SP 493754

Jonathan Dumbleton Pinfold (1825 - 1910)

Pinfold built the street on his land to provide cottages for his brickmaking employees.

He had a business as an engineer and millwright in Pinders Lane and later in Plowman Street. He also became a brickmaker in New Bilton and a trustee of the Rugby Freehold Land Society (1871 - 89).

Pipewell Close

Bilton, off Montgomery Drive

1948

SP 483741

Pipewell was a Cistercian abbey in Northamptonshire near Corby.

Among the Abbey’s possessions were several granges in and around Dunchurch, including one on land where Rugby School Close is situated, The most important of these granges was Cawston.

In common with most other monasteries, Pipewell was suppressed by King Henry VIII in 1538 and its properties passed into secular ownership.

The old English meaning of Pipewell is a ’spring or stream with a pipe or conduit’.

Plantagenet Drive

 

Bilton, Woodlands Estate, off Cymbeline Way

1966

SP 490727

 

Richard Plantagenet, 3rd .Duke of York (1411-60).

 

Richard Plantagenet is also a character in the historical plays entitled Henry VI Parts 1, 2 and 3 that were written by William Shakespeare (1564-1616).

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names "having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare's birth" in 1564.

 

Planter Close

Cawston, off Turchill Road

2004

SP 472736

John Montagu, 2nd Duke of Montagu KG GMB PC (1690-1749)

John Montagu purchased the Cawston estate about 1744 and was known as ‘John the Planter’ because of the avenues of trees he planted at or near his various properties. He was responsible for the avenue of trees alongside the Dunchurch to Coventry road.

A portrait of John Montagu by Godfrey Kneller in 1709 is in the National Portrait Gallery.

Plomer Close

Bilton, off Nelson Way

1948

SP 482738

John Plomer MA (1688 - 1759)

Headmaster, Rugby School (1731 - 42)

Also Rector of Bilton (1731 - 59)

Plowman Street

off Lawford Road

Prior to 1848

SP 499751

Henry Plowman of Northampton (died 1722), gent.

In 1720 he purchased from the Burnaby family their former manorial estate of Rugby. The manorial rights were sold separately to William Boughton (1682 - 1720) of Bilton.

In 1749 his daughter, Mrs Rebecca Pennington, sold the former manor house to Rugby School (see Pennington Street). In 1853 the first purpose built police station in Rugby was erected in Plowman Street.

Until the 1990s Plowman Street included a short terrace of houses that are is listed in the Rugby Almanacks as Cherry Terrace.

Pope Street

New Bilton, off Addison Road

1935

SP 490752

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

He was an English poet, satirist and translator of Homer.

In 1994 a memorial to Pope was erected in the Poets Corner of Westminster Abbey.

The Council felt that the road should be given a name associated with Addison's contemporaries because it was near to Addison Road.

Poplar Grove

off Lancaster Road

c1915

SP 508758

 

It is said that it was named so because the pavement was originally lined with Poplar trees

See also Acacia, Maple & Sycamore Groves

Pytchley Road

 

off Cromwell Road

 

1934

SP 510743

 

The Pytchley Hunt

 

Pytchley Hunt was founded in 1750 and today covers an area of western and central Northamptonshire.

Its kennels were formerly in Pytchley, but today are near Brixworth.

 

Queensferry Close

Bilton, off Nelson Way

1953

SP 483539

Queensferry, Flintshire, North Wales.

Willans and Robinson, which was one of the businesses that amalgamated in 1918 to form the English Electric Co., had a manufacturing plant at Queensferry from 1899 to 1910. The turbine hall, built between 1901 and 1906, was designed by H B Creswell, and was described by Sir Nicholas Pevsner (1902-83) as a rare English precursor of Functionalism. (see also Creswell Place)

The flats in Queensferry Close were built to provide accommodation for English Electric employees.

Queen Victoria Street

 

off Lower Hillmorton Road

1880

SP 510750

 

Alexandrina Victoria (1819-1901)

 

She became Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1837-1901)

 

In 1880 this street was originally named Victoria Street. When Rugby became a municipal borough in 1932, this resulted in there being two Victoria Streets in the borough. This street was renamed c1935 as Queen Victoria Street, to distinguish it from its more extensive namesake in New Bilton.

Railway Terrace

off Church Street

1841

SP 508751

London & Birmingham Railway and the Midland Counties Railway.

This street was built by the Midland Counties Railway to provide access from the town to the second of the railway stations.

The Rugby UDC decided in November 1910 that new name plates be fixed at convenient positions in the road in an attempt to dispense with its unofficial name of Station Road that was in frequent use at the time.

In its early years it was notorious for the bad image of the town that it presented to railway visitors due to its poor, muddy condition.

Rainsbrook Avenue

Hillmorton Paddox, off Hillmorton Road

1922

SP 528737

Rains Brook

Rains Brook runs through a valley to the south of Rugby and is a tributary of the River Leam.

For part of its length, Rains Brook forms the southern boundary of the Borough.

Ravenglass

 

Brownsover, off Kirkstone

 

1980

SP 519772

 

Ravenglass, Cumbria

 

Ravenglass is a small coastal village located at a natural harbour formed by the estuary of the rivers Esk, Mite and Irt. The town dates back at least to the Romans who had an important naval base there.

 

Ravenglass is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Ravenglass is the only coastal town in the Park and is the western terminus of the narrow gauge Ravenglass and Eskdale Railway. The railway runs up the Eskdale valley for 7 miles, to its eastern terminus at Dalegarth Station near Boot.

Red Poll Road

 

off Murray Road

 

 

SP 511757

 

Red Poll cattle

 

The Red Poll is a dual purpose breed of cattle that was developed in the latter half of the 19th century as a cross between the Norfolk Red beef and the Suffolk Dun dairy breeds.

Red Poll Road was built on the site of the former Rugby cattle market, that closed in 2008, where presumably the Red Poll was one of the cattle breeds that were sold there. Both of the original breeds are now extinct.

Regent Place

Town Centre, off Regent Street

1905

SP 504753

Part of the Regent Street development

Initially the western and northern sides of the undeveloped triangle of land on this site were named as St Andrews Street and Moat Street respectively.

In 1925 St Andrews Street & Moat Street were renamed as Regent Place.

Regent Street

Town Centre, off Church Street

1905

SP 504752

Regent Street, the famous shopping street in London.

When the Rugby Freehold Land Society developed the Moat Estate, their intention was that Regent Street was to become Rugby's main shopping street.

The developers’ intentions have largely been unfulfilled, but this has meant that Regent Street remains remarkably unspoilt and retains many of its Edwardian features, especially the upper floors.

Reynolds Close

Lower Hillmorton, off Constable Road

1966

SP 537740

Sir Joshua Reynolds RA, FRS, FRSA,  (1723 - 92)

English Artist.

Famous for his portraits. He was the 1st President of the Royal Academy (1768 – 92).

Richmond Road

off Slade Road

1932

SP 514547

Joseph Richmond MA (1720 - 1816)

Headmaster, Rugby School (1751 - 55)

He made no entries in the school Register, so there are no records by which to judge his time as headmaster.

Robotham Close

 

Newbold on Avon, off Cotterell Road

 

 

SP 498767

 

William Arthur Robotham (1902-77)

 

W A Robotham had been a member of the Rugby Borough Council (1936-70), including being the Mayor (1952-53). He was a JP from 1949 to 1972.

 

He was a draughtsman in the BTH Control Gear Engineering Department. Apart from his many political interests he also had an interest in the local brass bands. He was appoimted an honorary freeman of the Borough in 1966.

Rodney Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Frobisher Road

1961

SP 480743

George Brydges Rodney, 1st Baron Rodney,  (1718 - 92)

Admiral, RN (1778 - 82)

He was active at sea for most of his service career (1732 - 82). During his career he made a large amount of prize money.

Rosewood Avenue

Rokeby Estate, off Anderson Avenue

1955

SP 502738

Stanley Rose Wood (b 1848)

He was the nephew of Richard Henry Wood. “Rose” was the maiden name of the latter’s mother.

Rokeby Estate was built on part of the former Rokeby Farm that had been owned by Richard Henry Wood. (see also Belmont Road).

Rothley Drive

 

Brownsover, Avon Park, off Staveley Way.

 

1995

SP 521771

 

Rothley, Leicestershire

 

Rothley is a village and civil parish within the Borough of Charnwood. It is about 5 miles north of the city of Leicester. It has been inhabited since Saxon times.

The population of the civil parish was 3,897 in the 2011 Census.It has a station on the heritage railway line, the Great Central Steam Railway.

Round Street

off Lawford Road

1848

SP 498751

Stephen Round (d 1818)

The Round Street estate was built on land that he owned.

Stephen Round was a prominent Rugby landowner & an Attorney of HM Court of King’s Bench. He did not live in Rugby.

Rowse Close

 

Brownsover, off Stonehills

 

1972

SP 511770

 

Joseph Yates Rowse (1880-1955)

 

He had been headmaster of Eastlands Boys School (1907-46).

 

Rowse Close is one of a small group of roads In Brownsover that were named after former head teachers in the Borough.

Rupert Brooke Road

off Shakespeare Gardens

1960

SP 493734

Rupert Chawner Brooke (1887 – 1915)

see also 'Biographies' section of this website.

Poet. He is particularly known for his five war sonnets written during WW1.

He is one of 16 WW1 poets who are named on a memorial slab that was unveiled on 11 November 1985 in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

He was born in Hillmorton Road, Rugby and attended Rugby School. During WW1 he obtained a commission in the Royal Navy and died from blood poisoning whilst in a hospital ship moored off the Greek island of Skyros in the Aegean.

Ruskin Close

Hillside, off Norton Leys

1973

SP 497729

John Ruskin (1819 – 1900)

He was an influential art and social critic whose ideas had an important role in the shaping of the cultural values of the nineteenth century.

A memorial to Ruskin is in the Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

Brantwood, his country home overlooking Coniston Water, is now a museum dedicated to Ruskin.

Russelsheim Way

Town centre gyratory road system

1981

SP 500749

Russelsheim, Germany

This road marks the twinning in 1977 by Rugby Borough with Russelsheim in Germany

Russelsheim is noted for manufacturing Opel cars, now part of General Motors.

Rydal Close

 

Brownsover, off Lloyd Road

 

1972

SP 515768

 

Rydal Water, Cumbria

 

Rydal Water is one of the smallest lakes (¾ mile long and ¼ mile wide) in the Lake District. The small village of Rydal is near to the lake and is spread along the main road between Grasmere and Ambleside.

 

Rydal Close is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Rydal Water is a popular spot for visitors, bcause the area has many connections with Wordsworth (1770-1850) who lived for much of his life at Rydal Mount. Dr Thomas Arnold, headmaster of Rugby School, had a summer home at Fox Howe in nearby Under Loughrigg and Dr Arnold's son Matthew was a frequent visitor.

Sarawak Place

Cawston, off Gold Avenue

2004

SP 476736

Sarawak is one of two states in the Federation of Malaysia on the island of Borneo.

Sarawak is in the North West of Borneo. From 1841 to 1946 it was governed by a ‘White’ Rajah. It was a British Crown Colony from 1946 to 1963, when it became a founding member of the Malaysian Federation.

Princess Gold, the eldest daughter of the then Rajah of Sarawak, became in 1933 the second wife of the 2nd Earl of Inchcape (1887-1939). They lived in Cawston House until 1937. (see also Gold Avenue.)

Saxon Close

Cawston, off Cawston Grange Drive

2002

SP 472735

The first inhabitants of Cawston were Saxons.

The Saxons were a group of Germanic tribes that were first mentioned as living near the North Sea coast in the Roman empire.

The Saxons settled in England during the fifth century following the collapse of the Roman empire.

Saunton Road

 

Oversloade Estate, off Mellish Road

 

1948

SP 494742

 

Saunton, Devon

 

Saunton is a village close to the North Devon coast about 2 miles from Braunton, and about 8 miles north east of Barnstaple.

Saunton Road is another road in Overslade that was named after a golf course. Saunton is listed as one of the best courses in the UK.

Scafell

 

Brownsover, off Dunnerdale

 

1982

SP 516774

 

Scafell, Cumbria

 

Scafell is a mountain in the Southern Fells of the Lake District. The height of 3,162 feet (964 m) of its summit makes it the second highest mountain in England, with only its neighbour, Scafell Pike at 3,209 feet (978 m) being higher.

Scafell is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

 

Seabroke Avenue

off Lawford Road

c1919

SP 496451

George Mitchell Seabroke (c1848 - 1918)

Solicitor (1870 - 1918), Clerk to the Justices for Rugby Petty Sessional Division (1871 - 1918), Chief Officer of Rugby Volunteer Fire Brigade (1875 - 1918), a member of Board of Health & the Urban District Council (1875 - 1900).

Some time after 1891, Seabroke moved to 'Rosemount', a large house in Lawford Road situated opposite to the present junction with Seabroke Avenue.

Seathwaite

 

Brownsover, off Ennerdale

 

1975

 

 

SP 513774

 

Seathwaite, Cumbria

 

There are two places in Cumbria named Seathwaite, both situated in the Lake District National Park. There is a hamlet named Seathwaite in the civil parish of Borrowdale. Further south in the Duddon Valley there is a village with the same name which is in the civil parish of Dunnerdale with Seathwaite.

Seathwaite is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

In the 2011 Census the population of the civil parish of Borrowdale was 417 and the population of the civil parish of Dunnerdale with Seathwaite was 119.

 

Selside

 

Brownsover, off Hollowell Way

 

1977

 

SP 517774

 

Selside, Cumbria

 

Selside is a village in South Lakeland, about 6 miles north of Kendal.It is just within the border of the National Park

 

This is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Selside is now within the civil parish of Whitwell and Selside which in the 2011 Census had a population of 296.

Scholars Drive

Cawston, off Gerards Road

2004

SP 474738

Cawston Grange Primary School

Scholars Drive leads to the entrance to the school.

The land on which the school was built was formerly part of Cawston Grange. The Grange was owned by the monks of Pipewell. (see also Cawston Grange Drive.)

Shakespeare Gardens

off Dunchurch Road

1959

SP 497733

William Shakespeare (1564 – 1616)

Poet and dramatist. As a playwright he has a world-wide reputation.

In 1740 a memorial to Shakespeare was erected in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

He was born at Stratford-upon-Avon. He was buried in Holy Trinity, the parish church of Stratford-upon-Avon.

Shapfell

 

Brownsover, off Scafell

 

1982

SP 518774

 

Shap Fell, Cumbria

 

Shap Fell is a mountainous area about 14 miles south of Penrith. The A6 road crosses Shap Fell at 1,397 feet above sea level. Before the opening of the M6 in 1970, the A6 was the main north-south route from north west England to Scotland and often had notoriously bad road conditions during winter.

 

Shapfell is one of the roads in Brownsover  that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park

 

Sheep Street

Town Centre, off Market Place

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 503752

 

This was at the historic centre of the town in which a livestock market was held.

 

The livestock market was held in this street until 1870, when it was moved to Reynolds Field, a piece of the glebe land leased from the Rector of St Andrews Church.

Sheep Street became one-way for traffic in 1938 and pedestrianised in 1994.

Sheridan Close

Hillside, off Norton Leys

1964

SP 498731

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 – 1816)

Irish playwright and politician. He has been described as the greatest comic dramatist of modern times. He later became a Whig MP at Westminster (1780 -1812)

He is best known today as the author of the comic plays, The Rivals and The School for Scandal.

He was buried in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

Sheriff Road

off Eastlands Road

1926

SP 517750

Lawrence Sheriff (c1515 - 67)

see also 'Biographies' section of this website.

He founded Rugby School in 1567.

It is presumed that this road is another reminder of this famous Rugbeian.

Shuckburgh Crescent

 

off Balcombe Road

 

1937

SP 518735

 

Lower Shuckburgh

 

Lower Shuckburgh is a small village in eastern Warwickshire near to Napton on the Hill.

 

A little to the south of Lower Shuckburgh is the deserted village of Upper Shuckburgh. Shuckburgh is of Saxon origin and is mentioned in the Domesday Book as Socheberge, meaning a ‘hill or mound haunted by an evil spirit’.

Sidney Road

Hillmorton Paddox Estate, off Hillmorton Road

1925

SP 521741

Sidney John Dicksee (1855 - 1922)

Sidney Dicksee was the head of the well known building and contracting firm of Foster & Dicksee of Rugby and London. He was also president of the Rugby Freehold Land Society (1920-22);

Sidney Road was a development on Brown's Farm Estate, near the Paddox by the Rugby Freehold Land Society. The road was named by the Society to perpetuate the memory of their recently deceased president.

Skiddaw

 

Brownsover, off Grizedale

 

1976

SP 513774

 

Skiddaw, Cumbria

 

Skiddaw is a mountain just north of Keswick. At 3,054 feet it has the sixth highest summit in England.

Skiddaw is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Somers Road

New Bilton, off Addison Road

 

SP 490753

Sgt. James Somers VC (1893 - 1918)

Sgt Somers was briefly billeted with Mr & Mrs William Burn at 16, Corbett Street, Rugby, early in 1915. After his investiture in 1915 at Buckingham Palace he revisited Rugby and received a civic welcome.

Somers Road is part of an industrial estate and has no residential properties.

James Somers came from Clough-Jordan, Tipperary and was in the 1st Inniskilling Fusiliers. He was awarded the Victoria Cross in 1915 for gallantry in holding a trench against overwhelming odds at the Dardanelles.

 

Southbrook Road

Rokeby Estate, off Kingsway

1941

SP 500741

Sow Brook

South Brook is an alternative name for the more generally accepted Sow Brook. The brook runs through the land on which the Rokeby Estate was built.

Rokeby Estate was built on part of the former Rokeby Farm. (see also Belmont Road).

 

Southey Road

off Macaulay Road

1959

SP 494733

Robert Southey (1774 – 1843)

Southey was a poet and reviewer and another of the main figures of a group of poets who lived in the Lake District at the turn of the nineteenth century who were called the Lake Poets. He was Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom from 1813 until his death in 1843.

His memorial is in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

Southey was also a prolific letter writer, literary scholar, essay writer, historian and biographer. His biographies include those for John Bunyan, John Wesley, William Cowper, Oliver Cromwell and Horatio Nelson, with the latter probably his best known.

Spicer Place

Bilton, off Bilton Road

1973

SP 486741

Walter Harold Spicer (1890 - 1965)

He was the Engineer and Surveyor to Rugby Borough Council from 1930 to 1950 when he retired.

During his employment from 1921 to 1950 in the Engineering Department of the Borough Council (and its predecessor the Rugby Urban District Council), he had also been their Water Engineer and Gas Examiner.

Walter Spicer died at his home in Hampden Way, Bilton.

Spicer Place was built on the site of Bilton Rise, a large Victorian house with extensive grounds.

Spottiswood Close

Cawston, off Gerard Road

2002

SP 473736

Alicia Anne Spottiswoode (1810-1900)

Alicia was a Scottish songwriter and composer. Today she is chiefly known as the composer of the tune for “Annie Laurie”.

(see also Alicia Close.)

In 1836, Alicia married the Rt. Hon. John Douglas Montagu-Douglas-Scott, who, in 1827, had inherited the Buccleuch estates in the Dunchurch area, including Cawston, which became their chief residence.

Although her surname is spelt by most authorities as ‘Spottiswoode’, the close has always been spelt without the final ‘e’.

Stanley Road

 

Hillmorton, off Hillmorton Road

 

1983

SP 520741

 

Edward Marmaduke Stanley MA (1808-91)

 

The Rev E M Stanley was the vicar of Hillmorton St John (1864 to 1889). He attended Rugby School from 1816 to 1828 when he matriculated at Worcester College, Oxford University. He was awarded his BA in 1833 and his MA in 1836.

 

Stanley Road is one of a small group of roads in Hillmorton that were named after former vicars of St John the Baptist.

He was born at Rugby, where his father was an assistant master at Rugby School. On his retirement from the Hillmorton living he removed himself to Horton Street (now Horton Crescent) where he subsequently died.

Staveley Way

 

Brownsover, off Crowthorns

 

1993

SP 518768

 

Staveley, Cumbria

 

Staveley is a village in the South Lakeland District of Cumbria about 4 miles northwest of Kendal.and about 4 miles east of Windermere. It is split between the civil parishes of Nether Staveley and Over Staveley.

 

Staveley Way is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Staveley had a population of 1,147 at the 2011 Census.

There is also a small village named Staveley-in-Cartmel which is also in the Lake District and is near to the south end of Windermere. In the 2011 Census it had a population of 405.

Staverton Leys

off Orson Leys

1970

SP 500731

Staverton a village near to Daventry, Northants

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

The Old English name for Staverton was Stӕfertun, meaning a ‘farmstead made of or marked by stakes’.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Steele Street

New Bilton, off Addison Road

1935

SP 490751

Richard Steele (1672 - 1729)

He was an Irish writer and politician, who co-founded with his friend, Joseph Addison, the Tatler magazine in 1709 and The Spectator magazine in 1711.

The Council felt that the road should be given a name associated with Addison's contemporaries because it was near to Addison Road.

Stonehills

 

Brownsover, off Crow Thorns

 

1973

SP 511770

 

Stonehills Tarn, Cumbria

 

Stonehills tarn is an artificial tarn, privately owned, near Winster, southeast of Bowness-on-Windermere. It has the alternative name of Barrow Plantation Tarn.

 

Stonehills is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Stonehills Tarn covers about 3 acres and has a maximum depth of 6½ feet.

St Annes Road

 

Bilton, off Lytham Road

 

c.1939

SP 489742

 

Royal Lytham & St Annes Golf Club, Lytham St Annes, Lancashire.

The road developers, David Mitchell and his associates, named it after one of their favourite golf courses. (see also Lytham Road.)

The Royal Lytham & St Annes Golf Club was founded in 1886 and the present course constructed in 1897. It is one of the world's premier links courses, having hosted many major tournaments including eleven open championships.

St Georges Avenue

 

off Kingsway

 

1951

 

SP 500740

 

St George (about 278-303)

 

St George is the patron saint of England. He was reputed to be a Roman soldier of Greek origin who was sentenced to death for failing to give up his Christian belief.

 

Although St Georges Avenue was built after St George's Church, it is unlikely to be named after the church, as it is not within the parish area, which is centerd around Hillmorton Paddox. The church was dedicated to St George in September 1940.

St Johns Avenue

 

Hillmorton Paddox Estate, off Fareham Avenue

1931

SP 520738

 

St John's Church, Hillmorton

 

Although St Johns Avenue is about a mile in distance from St John's Church, it was then within the parish boundaries of this church.

Today (2017) the avenue is within the new parish of Rugby St George. The paris9h Church of St George's was built in 1960 in St Johns Avenue.

St John Street

 

off Newbold Road

 

c 1856

SP 501754

 

St John's Chapel

 

St John Street was named after the chapel which was built for Evangelical Christians in 1845.

 

The life of the chapel was short lived as it was first offered for sale in 1851 and then converted into four cottages abutting on to the south side of St John’s Street in 1859.

Although the chapel is shown on a detailed 1850 map of Rugby, St John Street is not shown.

St Marks Avenue

Bilton, off Cawston Way

1914

SP 484735

St Mark’s, the parish church of Bilton.

A church in Bilton features in the Domesday Book. Pevsner in his “Buildings of Warwickshire”, states that the current building dates from the early 14th century with much 19th century restoration.

The name was suggested by the developers, the Rugby Provident Permanent Benefit Building Society. This Society has now merged with the Hinckley Building Society to become the Hinckley and Rugby Building Society.

St Matthews Street

off Lawrence Sheriff Street

1842

SP 502750

St Matthew’s Church, Warwick Street

The street was built shortly after the church

The land upon which both the church and the street were built was previously owned by Dr R R Bloxam (1765-1840), an assistant master at Rugby School (1791-1827) and father of Matthew Bloxam (see Bloxam Place).

St Peters Road

off Clifton Road

1905

SP 515752

St Peter's Church, Clifton Road.

The road was made adjacent to the church.

St Peters Road runs from Clifton Road to Lower Hillmorton Road.

Studland Avenue

Hillmorton, off Kingsley Avenue

1939

SP 525741

Studland Bay, Dorset.

Studland Avenue was named by the developer, William Henry Adams (1873-1934) after Studland Bay which was a favourite holiday resort of his family.

This information was provided by Cedric Thomas Adams, the son of the developer, in his letter to the Rugby Advertiser dated 11 August 1983.

Sycamore Grove

off Lancaster Road

1913

SP 504757

 

Named so because the pavement was originally lined with Sycamore trees

See also Acacia, Maple & Poplar Groves

Sywell Leys

off Norton Leys

1977

SP 500729

Sywell is a village in the Borough of Wellingborough, Northants

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

The origin of the name Sywell is Old English, meaning ‘Seven Springs’.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Sywell has an aerodrome that caters for private flying, flight training and corporate flying. It opened in 1928 and was used in WW2 initially for basic pilot training and later as a repair base for Wellington bombers.

Temple Street

Brown’s Farm Estate, off Hillmorton Road

1879

SP 511747

Dr Frederick Temple DD (1821 - 1902)

Headmaster, Rugby School (1858 - 1869), Archbishop of Canterbury (1896 - 1902).

He was also Bishop of Taunton (1869 - 85) & Bishop of London (1885 - 96). He was the first president (1866 – 1902) of the Rugby Freehold Land Society which was responsible for the development of many residential estates in Rugby from 1866 to 1927. His memorial in Rugby is the Temple Speech Room in Hillmorton Road.

The land upon which Caldecott Street and Temple Street were built, was purchased by The Rugby Freehold Land Society (their Rugby Estate # 2) in 1868 from the executors of the late Count Wratislaw (1788-1853).

Tennyson Avenue

off Shakespeare Gardens

1959

SP 492735

Alfred Tennyson (1809 – 92), 1st Baron Tennyson of Aldworth in the County of Sussex.

He was a poet. On the death of Wordsworth in 1850 he was appointed Poet Laureate until his own death in 1892, the longest that any laureate has held this position. Today’s laureates are appointed for a ten year period.

He was buried in the Poets Corner of Westminster Abbey.

Among his works are The Charge of the Light Brigade, Maud, In Memoriam A H H, Locksley Hall and Idylls of the King. Edison recordings of him reading some of his poems are still available.

Many phrases from his poems have passed into the English language as everyday quotations, e.g. :-

·      ‘Theirs not to reason why, Theirs but to do and die,’

·      ‘In the Spring a young man’s fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love,’ and

·      ‘For men may come and men may go,

But I go on for ever.’

Thackeray Close

Hillside, off Norton Leys

1965

SP 498731

William Makepeace Thackeray (1811 – 63)

He was an author who established a reputation by writing novels that satirised the social values of his day.

There is a memorial bust of him in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

Although in his day he was ranked second only to Charles Dickens, he is today mainly remembered only for his novel Vanity Fair.

The Locks

 

Lower Hillmorton, off Brindley Road

see 'Notes' column.

 

SP 536742

 

The Hillmorton Locks, Oxford Canal.

 

This road leads to the three Hillmorton locks on the Oxford Canal.

 

Houses and other buildings on this road have been known as The Locks since the locks were built about 1773.

Thirlmere

 

Brownsover, off Copeland

 

1976

SP 511773

 

Thirlmere Reservoir, Cumbria

 

Thirlmere is a reservoir about three miles south of Keswick in Cumbria. Before construction of the reservoir in 1894 to provide water for Manchester, there was a smaller natural lake which had been known by several names.

 

Thirlmere is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

The original dam raised the water level by twenty feet providing a capability for supplying 10 million gallons a day. Subsequently the dam was raised to provide a water level fifty feet above natural and allow a possible supply of 40 million gallons per day.

Tom Brown Street

Town Centre, off Bath Street

1937

SP 509755

Tom Brown

Fictional hero of 'Tom Brown's Schooldays' by Thomas Hughes (1822 - 96)

This well known book about Rugby School was written in 1857.

Torrance Road (unadopted)

off Lawford Road

1889

SP 495752

Dr David Torrance (1798 - 1874)

He had a medical practice in Rugby from about 1827 having before been a surgeon in the Royal Navy.

He was also the Medical Officer to the Rugby Union and a director of the Rugby Gas Company (1841 -55).

Trussell Way

Cawston, off Cawston Grange Drive

2007

SP 471736

Margaret Trussell, née Boughton (bapt 1581)

Margaret married Thomas Trussell at Dunchurch in 1603.

Margaret’s father was Edward Boughton (d. 1589) who built Cawston Hall in 1585.

Turchil Road

Cawston, off Calvestone Road

2004

SP 475736

Turchil of Arden

Turchil was the son of Alwin, Sheriff of Warwickshire and was one of the few great Saxon landowners who continued to hold properties following the Norman invasion in 1066.

The Domesday Book shows that by 1086, Cawston, then known as Calvestone, was one of his estates, having previously in 1066 been held by Edwin (see Edwin Close).

Thorkell.was one of the alternative spellings of his name.

Turner Close

Lower Hillmorton, off Constable Road

1966

SP 536741

Joseph Mallord William Turner RA (1775 - 1851)

English painter.

He was buried in St Paul’s Cathedral, London,

British Romantic landscape painter, water-colourist, and printmaker.

Ulverston

 

Brownsover, off Buttermere

 

1980

SP 519771

 

Ulverston town, Cumbria

 

Ulverston is a market town on the Furness peninsula. It became a market town in 1280 when it was granted a Royal Charter by Edward I. It is also a civil parish that covers a quite extensive area around the town.

 

Ulverston road was so named because the town of Ulverston is close to the Lake District National Park.

Ulverston is the birthplace of Stan Laurel and now has a museum dedicated to him and his film partner, Oliver Hardy.

At the 2011 Census the civil parish had a population of 11,678, most of whom were in the east of the parish.

Union Street

Town Centre, within the gyratory system, off Russelsheim Way

It is shown in a map of 1849

SP 501749

The origin of this street name is not known.

Before the gyratory system development, Union Street extended from Warwick Street to just beyond East Union Street

It was built on part of Rugby Field where stood The Butts, an area outside the then town where young men were obliged by statute to practise their archery skills.

Vicarage Road

off Lawford Road

c 1893

SP 499751

St Matthew’s vicarage.

The road was built on part of the St Matthews glebe land behind the original vicarage in Bilton Road.

The land was sold by the church to Rugby Freehold Land Society for 18 building plots.

Victoria Street

 

New Bilton, off Lawford Road

 

 

SP 494752

Alexandrina Victoria (1819-1901)

 

She became Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1837-1901)

This street was laid out by the Harris family,

 

Warren Road

Hillmorton Paddox Estate, off Percival Road

1925

SP 516742

Robert Edward Warren Hawksley (1874 - 1947)

The road was named by the Rugby Freehold Land Society after Warren Hawksley, an architect and surveyor employed by the Society. He was also secretary of the Rugby Town Hall Company (1910 – 1920)

Warren Hawksley was one of the vendors of the land when the former Brown's Farm, near the Paddox, was developed by the Rugby Freehold Land Society.

Warwick Street

Town centre, off Lawrence Sheriff Street

see Reason column

SP 500750

see Reason column

This street was the start of the ancient road that led from Rugby to the county town of Warwick. Prior to the nineteenth century it was known simply as "The King's Highway".

In the mid Victorian period, Warwick Street included the Rugby end of Bilton Road from its junction with Lawford Road to, but not including, Oakfield House.

Warwick is of Old English origin, probably meaning ‘dwellings by the weir or river-dam’.

Webb Ellis Road

off Bilton Road

1950

SP 495748

William Webb Ellis BA, MA (1807 - 72)

See also 'Biographies' section of this website.

Attended Rugby School (1816 - 25) where, according to Matthew Bloxam, he was originator in 1823 of carrying the ball, the distinctive feature of the Rugby Football game.

Rugby Football Club's premises are in Webb Ellis Road.

Wells Street

off Bath Street

1895

SP 507755

Wells Cathedral, Somerset.

Thomas William Jex-Blake BA, BD & DD (1832 - 1915), headmaster of Rugby School (1874 - 87), became Dean of Wells Cathedral in 1891.

Dr Jex-Blake was an Old Rugbeian, who had also been an assistant master at Rugby (1858 - 68) and Principal of Cheltenham College (1868 - 74).

Welton Place

 

off Percival Road

 

1937

SP 516736

 

Welton, Northamptonshire

 

Welton is a village 9 miles south east of Rugby.

 

Welton is of Saxon origin and is mentioned in the Domesday Book with the various names of Waletone, Weletone and Welintone, probably meaning ‘farmstead by a spring or stream’.

The population in 2011 was 608.

Wentworth Road

Overslade Estate, off Dunchurch Road

1938

SP 500741

Wentworth Golf Club, Virginia Water, Surrey

The road developers named it after one of their favourite golf courses.

Wentworth Golf Club includes one of Britain's leading golf courses. It was founded in 1926.

Westfield Road

off Bilton Road

1945

SP 497748

Westfield House

The road was built on the 31½ acre estate attached to the large house in Bilton Road.

Among the former owners of the house was Richard Pennington (1799 - 1885), a retired cotton manufacturer and merchant.

West View Road

New Bilton, off Pendred Road

 

1921

SP 480749

Mrs Agatha Mary West (1884 - 1970) MBE

 

She was one of the first women members of the Warwickshire County Council and of the Rugby RDC.

The road could not be named “West Road” because this may have caused confusion with the then existing West Street in Rugby. Note that West Street was later demolished when Corporation Street was built and no longer exists.

Her husband, Lt Col Francis Charles B West of Bawnmore, Bilton, lost his life in France in 1916. Her father was William Dewar, a master at Rugby School (see Dewar Grove).

Mrs West married Randall Garfield Hosking CBE (1882-1951) in 1924.

Wetherell Way

Brownsover, off Hollowell Way

1974

SP 515773

Wilfrid Pattison (Pat) Wetherell (1912-78)

He was an Alderman on Rugby Borough Council (1958-70). He was also chairman of the housing committee when the Council purchased the 214 acre Brownsover Estate from the Boughton-Leigh family.

Rowse Close is one of a small group of roads In Brownsover that were named after former head teachers in the Borough.

In addition to his work as a councillor, he was also teacher at Elborow Junior School (1948-1959), having been acting headmaster from 1957 until the school was closed in 1959. Until he retired from teaching he was then head of Binley Woods First School.

Whernside

 

Brownsover, off Hollowell Way

 

1978

SP 514773

 

Whernside, North Yorkshire

 

Whernside is a mountain in the Yorkshire dales on the border with Cumbria. It is about 6 miles north of Ingleton and about 8 miles north west of Horton-in-Ribblesdale.  It is the highest point in North Yorkshire at 2,415 feet (736 m).

 

Whernside is in the Yorkshire Dales National Park. It is climbed as part of the Yorkshire Three Peaks Challenge, the other peaks being Ingleborough, 2,372 feet or 723 m, and Pen-y-ghent, 2,277 feet or 694 m. Whernside also lies about 2 miles northwest of the spectacular Ribblehead Viaduct on the Settle to Carlisle railway.

Whitefriars Drive

Cawston, off Calvestone Road

2004

SP 477741

The Carmelite Friary, Coventry

The church of the Carmelite Friars in Coventry is known as the Whitefriars Church. Following its dissolution in 1538, the church was partially demolished and some of the materials were used by Edward Boughton (d. 1589) in the building of Cawston Hall in 1585.

The Carmelites are a mendicant religious order. They were known as the Whitefriars because of their white cloak in comparison with the grey cloak worn by the Franciscans.

Whitehall Road

off Clifton Road

1879

SP 508751

Named after Whitehall, an old house that was formerly at the present junction of Clifton Road and Whitehall Road.

Whitehall was probably a 15th century open hall house that by the mid 19th century had become three tenements or cottages

The old building was purchased in 1879 by the Local Board of Health for road widening. Before the widening, Whitehall Road was known as Bridle Lane.

Whittle Close

Bilton, off Bawnmore Road

1964

SP 489731

Sir Frank Whittle OM, KBE, CB, FRS, FRAeS (1907 - 96)

Inventor of the turbojet engine

His first demonstration turbojet engine was manufactured and tested at the BTH factory, Rugby in 1937.

Wigston Road

 

Hillmorton, off Coton Road

 

1962

 

SP 532739

Robert Wigston

 

Robert Wigston was the vicar of St John the Baptist from 1565 to 1606.

Wigston Road is one of a small group of roads in Hillmorton that were named after former vicars of St John the Baptist.

Wilf Brown Close

Brownsover, off Brownsover Lane

2015

SP 511777

Wilfred Frank Brown (1941 – 2004)

Leading Ambulanceman and Technician (1966 – 2001).

Wilf Brown Close was built on the site of the former ambulance station in Brownsover where Wilf Brown was based for the latter part of his career.

William Street

off Railway Terrace

1841

SP 506752

Count William Ferdinand Wratislaw (1788 - 1853)

The street was built on land owned by Count Wratislaw, a solicitor & attorney who resided and practised in Church Street, Rugby.

When this street was first laid out it was about a quarter of its present length and was a cul-de-sac.

Willoughby Place

 

off Balcombe Road

 

1938

SP 518735

 

Willoughby village

 

Willoughby is a Warwickshire village about 5 miles to the south of Rugby.

 

Willoughby is of Saxon origin and is variously mentioned in the Domesday Book as Wilebere, Wilibene, Wilibei,and Wilebec. Its origin is a combination of Old English, Wilig, and Old Scandinavian (i.e. Viking), by, meaning ‘farmstead by the willow-trees’.

In 2011 it had a population of 398.

Wilson Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cornwallis Road

1990s

SP 482749

Sir Arthur Knyvet Wilson, GCB (1842 - 1921)

Admiral of the Fleet, RN (1907 - 11).

1st Sea Lord (1910 - 11)

Windermere Close

 

Brownsover, off Stonehills

 

1973

SP 513772

 

Lake Windermere, Cumbria

 

Windermere is the largest natural lake in England The town that developed around the railway station that was opened in 1847 became known as Windermere.

 

Windermere Close is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

The civil parish of Windermere had a population of 8,359 in the 2011 Census.

Winfield Street

off Clifton Road

1897

SP 514753

Rev Henry Whinfield BA, DD (1726 - 93)

He was the largest landowner to benefit from the enclosure of the Parish of Rugby in 1774.

Winfield Street was built on land that he owned jointly with a “Mr Round”.

Although he was born in Dunchurch, he never lived in Rugby and its surrounds following his matriculation at Peterhouse, Cambridge University, in  1746.

The street name has always been spelt without the letter "h".

Windmill Close

 

Hillmorton, off Crick Road

 

 

SP 538736

 

‘Hillmorton' Windmill

 

Windmill Close was built on or near the site of a windmill at Hillmorton that was demolished in 1899.

 

This windmill had been erected by 1787 and became disused about 1890. It replaced an older windmill that had been erected by 1584. The later mill was a brick built tower mill.

Wise Grove

Abbotts Farm Estate, off McKinnell Crescent

1956

SP 525748

Thomas Arnold Wise MA (1861 - 1940)

He was the charter mayor in 1932. He was also a chairman of Rugby UDC (1903 - 5 & 1923 - 24).

He was also a headmaster of a boys’ preparatory school at Oakfield in Bilton Road.

Wolsey Road

 

Bilton, Woodlands, Estate, off Cymbeline Way

 

1967

SP 488728

 

Thomas Wolsey, Cardinal (1473-1530)

 

Wolsey was a churchman and statesman who became a cardinal. Cardinal Wolsey is a prominent character in Henry VIII, the historical play written about 1613 by William Shakespeare, (1564-1616), ,

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names "having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare's birth" in 1564.

 

Wood Street

off Newbold Road

See notes

SP 501760

Frederick Wood (c1807 - 93)

He was a surveyor and land agent who lived and worked in Rugby from about 1840 until 1881. His employment included being assistant chief engineer and Chief Engineer of the Oxford Canal Co (1824 - 53) and as a land agent for the L&NW Railway (1853 - 81). Whilst in Rugby he was also an Inspector and a director of the Rugby Gas & Coke Co. In 1868 he became a founder member of the Institution of Surveyors (now the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors).

This street was built in two phases. The eastern end was constructed 1872 and was extended in 1890 to provide direct access to Newbold Road from the station.

Wooll Street

off Sheep Street

This short passage is of ancient origin, but was not named until 1956.

SP 502751

Dr John Wooll, DD (1767 - 1833)

Headmaster, Rugby School (1807 - 28). During his time as headmaster, the school was entirely rebuilt and its fortunes changed considerably. By 1818 pupil numbers had increased to over 380, making Rugby second only in size to Eton. Pupil numbers then declined progressively to only 123 in 1828.

Why this short passage, with no residences or shops, was named as a street has not been explained.

Wordsworth Road

off Shakespeare Gardens

1959

SP 496733

William Wordsworth (1770 – 1850)

He was one of the major English ‘romantic’ poets and was one of the main figures of a group of poets who lived in the Lake District at the turn of the nineteenth century who were called the Lake Poets. He became the Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom in 1843 following the death of Robert Southey.

He has a memorial in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

Among his major works are Wandered Lonely as a Cloud and The Prelude.

In Grasmere, Cumbria, the Wordsworth Trust maintains Dove Cottage, where he wrote some of his greatest poetry, and the adjoining Wordsworth Museum.

Wortley Close

Cawston, off Gerard Road

2004

SP 474739

Sir Richard Wortley (c1565-1603), Kt, of Wortley Hall, Yorkshire.

Sir Richard was married in 1578 to Elizabeth (1568-1642), daughter of Edward Boughton of Cawston (d. 1589). (see also Devonshire Close)

This Edward Boughton who died in 1589, built the original Cawston Hall in 1585. The building of the hall is believed to have impoverished Boughton and he had to borrow money from Richard Wortley.

Wythburn Way

 

Brownsover, off Scafell

 

1982

SP 518774

 

Wythburn Village, Cumbria

 

Most of Wythburn Village was submerged when Thirlmere Reservoir was completed in 1894 leaving a few cottages and a church. The village was about 10km to the south of Keswick and about 3km from the summit of Hellvellyn.

Wythburn Way is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District.

Wythburn village is now part of St John's, Castlerigg and Wythburn civil parish which had a population of 422 in the 2011 Census.

Yates Avenue

Newbold-on-Avon, off Leicester Road

1950

SP 501754

Henry (known as Harry) Yates (1879 - 1929)

In 1913 he became the first Labour member of the Rugby UDC and was its elected chairman from 1924 to 1926.

Mrs Edith Yates, his widow, on July 4th 1929 became the first woman to be elected as a councillor of the Rugby UDC.

He died whilst contesting the 1929 General Election as the local Labour candidate. In the 1911 census his occupation was described as a tripe dresser.

 

 

Print

Roads A - I

 

Road Name

Area

 Date

Grid Ref.

Person/ Place

Reason

Notes

Abbey Street

off Murray Road

1893

SP 511758

It is reputed that the street was named after George Abbey (1848- 1938)

In the 1880s he was the owner of a "hansom cab" which he used to collect people from the railway station.

Family members say that he had stables in Abbey Street. In the 1880s he was living in Spring Street and was described as a cab driver and beer retailer. By 1901 he was the landlord of the 'Woolpack' in Lower Street, Hillmorton.

Acacia Grove

off Lancaster Road

c1914

SP 503758

 

It is said to have been so named because the pavement was originally lined with Acacia trees

See also Maple, Poplar & Sycamore Groves.

Addison Road

Between Bilton Road, Bilton, and Lawford Road, New Bilton.

1880s

SP 491753

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Essayist, poet and politician. Addison owned the manor of Bilton and resided in Bilton Hall from 1711 to 1719. In 1716, he married Charlotte (1680 -1731), the widow of Richard, 6th Earl of Warwick.

See also Steele Street.

A memorial statue of Addison is in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

Prior to 1954 the part of the present day Addison Road between Bilton Road and Sow Brook was named as Campbell Road and the hill section from Sow Brook to the cemetery entrance was known as Croop Hill.

Campbell Road was presumably named after James Archibald Campbell (1807 - 1879), see Campbell Street, New Bilton.

Albert Square

off Albert Street

1990

SP 507754

Albert Joseph Richardson (1811 - 68)

(see also Albert Street)

His mother, Mrs Anne Richardson (1791 - 1861), owned the land on which Albert Square was made.

Mrs Richardson inherited considerable land in 1828 when her husband, James Richardson, died. Albert Joseph was her oldest son.

Albert Street

Town Centre, off Church Street

1851

SP 505752

Albert Joseph Richardson (1811 - 68)

His mother, Mrs Anne Richardson (1791 - 1861) owned the land on which Albert Street was made.

Mrs Richardson inherited considerable land in 1828 when her husband, James Richardson, died. Albert Joseph was her oldest son. See also James Street.

Alexandra Road

off Wood Street

1904

SP 507758

Alexandra of Denmark (1844 - 1925)

She was the wife of the then reigning British monarch, King Edward VII (1901 - 10). (see also King Edward Road)

She married Edward, Prince of Wales, in 1863. Their coronation was in 1902.

Alfred Green Close

off Dunchurch Road

1978

SP 501744

Alfred Thomas Green (1918 - 76)

Alderman & Mayor of Rugby Borough Council (1968 - 69)

He was also a Borough councillor (1958 - 76) and an estate agent in the Town.

Alicia Close

Cawston, off Gerard Road

2002

SP 472738

Alicia Anne Spottiswoode (1810-1900)

Alicia was a Scottish songwriter and composer. Today she is chiefly known as the composer of the tune for “Annie Laurie”.

(see also Spottiswood Close.)

In 1836, Alicia married the Rt. Hon. John Douglas Montagu-Douglas-Scott, who, in 1827, had inherited the Buccleuch estates in the Dunchurch area, including Cawston, which became their chief residence.

Alwyn Road

off Main Street, Bilton

1934

SP 482736

It is said to have been named after Alwyn Wootton Crowther (1922-2000).

His father Thomas Edward Crowther (1893-1963) owned part of the land on which the road was built.

Thomas Edward Crowther was an agent and building society branch manager and in 1932 was elected to the first Rugby Borough Council.

Ambleside

 

Brownsover, off Buttermere

 

1974

SP 518770

 

Ambleside, Cumbria

 

Ambleside is a town about a mile from the head of Lake Windermere, England's largest lake.

 

Ambleside is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Ambleside had a population of 2,600 in the 2011 Census.

Anderson Avenue

Rokeby Estate, off Kingsway

1939

SP 501740

Anne Rose Anderson, née Wood, (1852 – 1940).

She was the niece of Richard Henry Wood. She married William Henry Anderson (1846 – 1911) in 1885.

She inherited Rokeby House in 1908 from Richard Henry Wood.

Rokeby Estate was built on part of the former farm estate attached to Rokeby House

Anson Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Frobisher Road

1960s

SP 483747

George Anson, 1st Baron Anson, (1697 - 1762)

Admiral, RN (1746 - 61)

Anson circumnavigated the world (1740 - 44) & captured the Manila Spanish treasure galleon. Was 1st Lord of the Admiralty (1751 – 62).

Arden Close

 

Bilton, Woodlands Estate, off Montague Road

 

1971

SP 490725

 

Forest of Arden

 

The Forest of Arden is the setting of "As You Like It", a comedy written by William Shakespeare in 1599. Arden may be either the forest of the same name in Warwickshire or may refer to the forested area of the Ardennes in north east France.

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names "having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare's birth" in 1564.

 

Ariel Way

Bilton, Woodlamds Estate, off Wolsey Road

1964

SP 488726

“Ariel” a spirit who does the bidding of Prospero, the overthrown Duke of Milan.

Ariel is a character in “The Tempest”, a play by William Shakespeare that was written in 1610/11. Prospero is the main character in the play.

The names of most roads in the Woodlands Estate were selected by the Council “with regard to the quarter-centenary of the birth of Shakespeare.” (see also Shakespeare Gardens.)

Arnold Street

Town Centre, off Railway Terrace

1874

SP 507754

Dr Thomas Arnold DD (1795 - 1842)

Headmaster, Rugby School (1828 - 42)

Dr Arnold was famous for reforming the way the School was run, & turning its fortunes around.

Assheton Close

 

Bilton, off Magnet Lane

 

1965

 

SP 482736

 

The Assheton family

 

This family had a long association with Bilton from 1862 when the Rev Richard Orme Assheton MA (1836-1909) came to the village as its Rector (1862-1900).

 

Other prominent members of the Assheton family to live in Bilton were

1) the Rev William Orme Assheton (1866-1953), who succeeded his uncle, R O Assheton, as rector, and

2) William's son Nicholas Master Assheton (1905-94) who was mayor of Rugby in 1965-66.

Badby Leys

off Orson Leys

1964

SP 499732

Badby village, near Daventry, Northants

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

Badby’s origin is pre-Domesday and its name consists of an Old English personal name (Badda) and an Old Scandinavian (i.e. Viking) element, by, meaning ‘farmstead.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Bank Street

off Regent Street

1901

SP 504753

It is uncertain why this street was so named.

A former resident understood that it was to be named Post Office Street, after the nearby, new post office in Albert Street but due to dissatisfaction with the new premises, it was decided to name it Bank Street after the nearby, bank in Church Street that had a grander appearance.

Bank Street was part of the development by the Rugby Freehold Land Society of the Moat Estate.

Barby Road

off Hillmorton Road

see Notes column

SP 504749

Barby, Northampton-shire

It was the historic route between Rugby and Barby, known as the Barby road.

Matthew Bloxam recalled that “…in 1813 on the Barby Road there was no house or building, except a barn or two, for a mile.”

Barby is of Old Scandinavian (i.e. Viking) origin meaning ‘farmstead or village on the hill(s)’.

It probably started out as a bridle way. It was known as Watergate Street from the mid 18th cen to 1891 when it received its present name.

Barrington Road

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Frobisher Road

1960s

SP 481745

Samuel Barrington (1729 - 1800)

Admiral, RN (1787 – 90).

Apart from five years following the Treaty of Paris in 1763, most of his fifty year naval career from 1740 to 1790 was spent at sea.

A portrait of Barrington by Sir Joshua Reynolds can be seen at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich.

Barton Road

Bilton, off Overslade Lane

1956

SP 490735

Clement Mervyn Barton (1885 - 1952)

Clement Barton resided at Red Lodge, Overslade Lane and owned the land on which Barton Road was built.

He was a former Army Captain and veterinary surgeon who, after WW1, devoted his life to breeding racehorses.

Bath Street

Town Centre, off Clifton Road

see Notes column

SP 507751

It was originally a narrow country lane, known as Bath Lane.

The lane is said to have been named from being the route taken by boys from Rugby School on their way to popular bathing places in the River Avon.

The lane was familiarly known as Pigstye Lane from the pig-houses on its eastern side at the town end.

It became a residential street from 1878.

Bawnmore Road

 

Bilton, off The Green

 

c1936

 

SP 484737

 

‘Bawnmore'

 

Bawnmore was a large house near to the present junction between Bawnmore Road and Overslade Lane.

 

The estate attached to Bawnmore House was about 35 acres in area. The part of the present Bawnmore Road between Dunchurch Road and the junction with Overslade Lane was originally known as Featherbed Lane after the nearby Featherbed Farm.

Beaconsfield Avenue

St Maries Estate, Off Churchill Road

1958

SP 502744

Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, KG PC FSA (1804 – 81)

He was a British politician and writer. During his parliamentary career from 1837 to 1876, he held many political offices that included twice serving as Prime Minister. Following his ennoblement in 1876, he was Leader of the House of Lords until his death.

As he was ennobled late in life, he is better known as Disraeli.

Amongst his writings were 16 novels and several political non-fiction works including a political biography, the Life of Lord George Bentinck,

Beatty Drive

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Blackwood Avenue

1957

SP 486745

David Richard Beatty, 1st Earl Beatty, (1871 - 1936)

Admiral of the Fleet, RN (1919 - 27). He became 1st Sea Lord in 1919.

He was well known to residents of the town and district as he frequently visited “The Moat” in Church Street, Rugby, the home of his father, Captain David Longfield Beatty, whilst on holiday from the Navy.

He was buried in St Paul’s Cathedral, London.

Beckfoot Close

 

Brownsover, off Dunnerdale

 

1984

 

SP 517775

 

Beckfoot, Cumbria

 

Beckfoot is a coastal hamlet in the civil parish of Holme St Cuthbert, about 3 miles south of Siloth. It is about 25 miles to the west of the county town of Carlisle.

In the 2011 Census, Holme St Cuthbert parish had a population of 465.

 

Bell Walk

 

Hillmorton, off Wesley Road

 

 

SP 534738

 

Bell Inn, High Street, Hillmorton

 

The licensee of the Bell Inn, Mr Arnold Elliott, was also President of the National Association of Licensed Victuallers National Homes when they developed Bell Walk.

The homes in Bell Walk were built by the Association for retired publicans.

 

Belmont Road

Rokeby Estate, off Kingsway

1938

SP 501740

Belmont House, Sidmouth, Devon.

 

Richard Henry Wood (1820 – 1908), moved from Rugby to Belmont House in 1895 in order to take advantage of its mild climate. On his retirement in 1874 from a Manchester business career, Mr Wood lived in Rugby until his removal to Devon.

(See also the Biographies section of this website.)

Richard Henry Wood’s generosity helped to provide the town of Rugby with the Hospital of St Cross and a public library in St Matthews Street.

Rokeby Estate was built on part of the former Rokeby Farm estate that he had owned.

 

Bennfield Road

 

off West Leyes

 

1931

 

SP 499752

 

Bennfield House

 

Built in 1669 Bennfield House was the North Street family residence of the Benn family from 1813.

 

Bennfield House was demolished in 1930 and the site is now (2017) occupied by Barclays Bank. The 'field' in the name refers to land to the west of North Street, opposite, that was part of the house estate or gardens.

Benn Street

 

off Cromwell Road

 

1905

 

SP 511745

 

George Charles Benn BA (1822-1895)

 

G C Benn was the youngest of five brothers, none of whom had married. As each of them died much of their wealth was passed on to the surviving brothers until George Charles Benn became the custodian of the family wealth and a very rich man.

They all made generous contributions to Rugby and neighbouring communities.

 

The road was laid out by the Rugby Freehold Land Society on Naseby's Field which they purchased in 1902. 

Amongst his generosity to the town, George defrayed the cost of the new tower and spire on St Andrew's Church and also the erection of a school in Craven Road, (Benn School). He also bequeathed the "Shoulder of Mutton" and £6,000 to the Local Board of Health which was used by its successor, the Rugby Urban District Council, to erect the Benn Buildings in the High Street as its municipal offices. Today his memorial is the Benn Hall, adjoining the Town Hall.

Beswick Gardens

Bilton, off Bawnmore Road

1964

SP 487734

Joseph William Beswick (1888 - 1963)

Mayor of Rugby (1942-43); he was a member of the Rugby Urban District Council and its successor, the Rugby Borough Council, from 1925 until 1947.

By occupation, he was an engineer at the BTH in Rugby (1920 - 52). He was an active member of the Rotary Club in Rugby.

Biart Place

off Clifton Road

1967

SP 516755

Douglas Edgar Biart (1894 - 1986)

Clerk to Rugby UDC (1928 - 32) & and its successor, the Rugby Borough Council (1932 - 54).

When he retired he was made an honorary freeman of the town.

A highlight of his career was his successful presentation in 1932 of the petition by Rugby UDC to a Privy Council enquiry for a Charter of Incorporation as a Municipal Borough.

Bilton Road

Town Centre, off Corporation Street

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 500750

Bilton Village

It was the historic route from Rugby to Bilton & onward to the County town of Warwick. It was part of the Rugby & Warwick Turnpike (1818 -78).

In the mid 18th cen. that part of Bilton Road running south west from its junction with Lawford Road to Oakfield (a large residence/preparatory school) was known as Warwick Street.

In the Domesday Book ‘Bilton’ was spelt either as Beltone or as Bentone. Its original meaning (Old English) was possibly “farmstead where henbane grows”.

Blackwood Avenue

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Addison Road

1958

SP 488745

Sir Henry Blackwood KCB, (1770 - 1832)

Vice-Admiral, RN (1825 - 32)

Captain of frigate Euryalus at Trafalgar, 1805.

There is a memorial tablet for him in the west aisle of the north transept of Westminster Cathedral.

Blake Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cunningham Way

1960s

SP 482745

Sir Geoffrey Blake KCB, (1882 - 1968)

Vice-Admiral, RN (1935 - 38)

In 1938 he retired early from active service due to ill health.

Bleaberry

 

Brownsover, off Copeland

 

1978

SP 511773

 

Bleaberry Tarn, Cumbria

 

Bleaberry Tarn lies in a corrie below the fells of Red Pike and High Stile. The stream Sour Milk Gill descends from the tarn to Buttermere.

 

Bleaberry is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

A tarn is a small lake in mountains, usually fomed by glaciers.

There is also a fell named Bleaberry with a height of 1,936 feet (590 m). It is on the main watershed between Thirlmere and Borrowdale.

Bloxam Gardens

off Bilton Road

1938

SP 496748

Matthew Holbeche Bloxam (1805 - 88) - see also Biographies section of this website.

A local antiquarian & solicitor (1827 - 88).

Until about 1990 the spelling on the street sign was ‘Bloxham’.

Lived in Rugby for all his life. He was an elected member of the Local Board of Health (1855 – 64) and was clerk to the Rugby Petty Sessions (1831 – 71)

Bloxam Place

off Warwick Street

1934

SP 501750

Matthew Holbeche Bloxam (1805 - 88) - see also Biographies section of this website.

A local antiquarian & solicitor (1827 - 88)

Prior to 1934, Bloxam Place was a private, un-named road from 1842 adjoining Bloxam's house in St Matthews Street.

Blyth Close

Cawston, off Turchill Road

2004

SP 475738

Charles Edward Blyth (1871-1940)

In 1911, Blyth took a 21 year lease of the Cawston House estate. In 1919 he purchased the property from its owner, the 1st Lord Waring, London art dealer and land speculator.

In 1925, the Cawston House estate was sold to the Hon. Kenneth Mackay, who later became Viscount Glenapp and the 2nd Earl of Inchcape.

Blyth was a member of Charles Nelson and Co Ltd, cement manufacturers of Stockton, Warwickshire.

Bond Street

New Bilton, off Bridget Street

(see also Reason column)

SP 496754

The reason behind this street name is not known.

see ‘Notes’ column

Prior to 1949 it was named Bull Street after the builder, W H Bull of Northampton. The name change took place following a petition by the residents.

At the meeting of the Borough Council that approved this change of name, it was implied that the street was renamed after the famous London street as none of its residents would object to the new choice of name.

Bonington Close

Lower Hillmorton, off Constable Road

1966

SP 536741

Richard Parkes Bonington (1802 – 28)

 English Romantic landscape painter.

His landscapes were mostly of coastal scenes, with a low horizon and large sky. He died of TB in London.

Borrowdale

 

Brownsover, off Grizedale

 

1976

SP 518775

 

Borrowdale, Cumbria

 

The civil parish of Borrowdale covers a considerable area south of Derwent Water in and around Borrowdale valley and includes several small settlements in the valley.

Borrowdale is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

In the 2011 Census the population of the parish of Borrowdale was 417.

Boswell Road

off Tennyson Avenue

1959

SP 494731

James Boswell (1740 – 95)

Scottish lawyer, diarist and author.

He met Dr Samuel Johnson on several occasions and toured Scotland with him in 1763. His last meeting with Johnson was in 1784. His Life of Samuel Johnson, considered by many to be the most celebrated biography in the English language, was published in 1791.

Boundary Road

off Hillmorton Road

1932

SP 516745

The boundary of Rugby Parish

Boundary Road runs along part of the boundary line between Rugby & Hillmorton parishes.

Prior to the boundary changes of 1932, it was also on the boundary line of Rugby Urban District Council.

Bowen Road

Hillmorton Paddox Estate, off Hillmorton Road

1925

SP 510742

Charles John Bowen Cooke J P (1859 - 1920)

The developer of the road, the Rugby Freehold Land Society, named it after Bowen Cooke, a former president (1903 - 20).

He was also the running superintendent at Rugby of the L&NW Railway and from 1909 until his death was chief mechanical engineer of the L&NWR

Bow Fell

 

Brownsover, off Hawlands

 

1975

SP 517770

 

Bowfell Mountain, Cumbria

 

Bowfell lies in the centre of the Lake District in the Southern Fells area. At 2,959 feet (902 m), Bowfell is the sixth highest mountain in the Lake District.

Bow Fell is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

The Ordnance Survey maps name the mountain as Bow Fell.

A fell is the local name for a mountain or hill.

Brafield Leys

off Norton Leys

1979

SP 501730

Brafield on the Green, a village south east of Northampton.

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Braunston Place

 

off Percival Road

 

1936

SP 516737

 

Braunston, Northamptonshire

 

Braunston is a village to the east of Rugby just within the Northants boundary. In 2011 it had a population of 1759.

 

Braunston is of early Saxon origin and is recorded in the Domesday Book as Brandestone. The original meaning of the name was “farmstead of a man called Brant”.

Braunston became an important canal centre on the through route between the North and London, following a junction being made there in 1803 between the Oxford and Grand Junction canals.

Brindley Road

Hillmorton, off Lower Street

1966

SP 534742

James Brindley (1716 - 72)

A millwright, he became prominent as a builder of many of the early English canals. One of these was the Oxford Canal which passes near Rugby, although he died before it was completed

Brindley Road leads, via The Locks (qv), to a flight of three, doubled, locks on the Oxford Canal and some old buildings which were the local depot of the canal engineering department.

Bronte Close

off Clifton Road

1995

SP 514751

Charlotte, Emily and Anne Brontë (1816 - 55, 1818 - 48, 1820 – 49, respectively)

These sisters were renowned English novelists and poets.

A memorial tablet for the three sisters is in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

Bronte Close is on former site of the Rugby High School for Girls, which named one of its school houses after the sisters.

Browning Road

Hillmorton, Low Hills Estate, off Mellor Road

1961

SP 539738

Charles William Browning MBE (1880 - 1947)

He was a member of the Rugby Urban District Council and its successor, the Rugby Borough Council, from 1923 to 1945. He became mayor of Rugby (1936 - 37) and was also an alderman of both the Rugby Borough and Warwickshire County Councils.

He was the first Labour mayor, having been a trade union official and plasterer.

As part of his contribution to the town and the county he served on many public service committees.

Brudenell Close

Cawston, off Turchill Road

2002

SP 472736

George Brudenell, 1st Duke of Montagu (2nd creation) KG, PC, FRS (1712-90)

In 1730 he married Lady Mary, Montagu, daughter of John Montagu, 2nd Duke of Montagu (1st creation). In 1749 they inherited the estates of the 2nd Duke, including Cawston and George assumed the surname “Montagu”. In 1766 he was created Duke of Montagu, a title which had become extinct with the death of his father-in-law.

He became the 4th Earl of Cardigan on the death of his father in 1732. On his death, only his daughters survived him, and thus the Dukedom again became extinct.

Much of his personal estate passed to his daughter, Elizabeth, who, in 1767, had married Henry, 2nd Duke of Buccleuch.

Buchanan Road

off Bilton Road

1937

SP 492745

David Buchanan BA (1830-1900)

He was a nationally known cricketer, having played for the Gentlemen of England and the All England Eleven. He was also a founder member & the first Captain of Warwickshire County Cricket Club (1882 - 83).

He was an elected member of the Local Board of Health and its successor, the Rugby Urban District Council (1881 - 99). Amongst his other local activities he was a player and officer of the Rugby Cricket Club and an officer of the Rugby Lawn Tennis Club.

Burnside

off Westfield Road

1938

SP 496746

 

It is presumed that it was so named because of the brook (or 'burn') that ran through the Westfield estate.

The road was built on the 31½ acre estate attached to Westfield House in Bilton Road.

Among the former owners of the estate was Richard Pennington (1799 - 1885), a retired cotton manufacturer and merchant.

Butlers Leap

off Clifton Road

see Notes column

SP 521759

Named after a Rugby School boy named Butler

The boy is famed for jumping clear over Clifton Brook where it was crossed by the Clifton Road. The road and brook have since been re-aligned, thereby preventing similar 'leaps' in modern times.

Matthew Bloxam thought the boy was Spencer Percival Butler (1828 - 1915), son of the Rev Dr Butler of Gayton, Northants. WD Rouse says he was another son, Arthur Gray Butler (1832 - 1909).

Butler’s Leap runs through an several industrial estates and has no residences.

Butlin Road

off Clifton Road

1920

SP 518754

Butlin family

Following the death of her husband, William Butlin (1730 - 91), a draper, Ann Butlin (1743 - 1826) acquired a banking business from Samuel Clay and re-named it Butlins Bank.

Ann Butlin's eldest child, William (1773 - 1837), managed the bank until his death. The Bank was then inherited by William's youngest sister, Maria Benn, née Butlin, (1787 - 1881) and passed into the ownership of the Benn family. (see also Benn Street.)

It was sold to the Lloyds Banking Company in 1868.

Buttermere

 

Brownsover, off Hawlands

 

1975

SP 519770

 

Buttermere village and lake, Cumbria

 

The village of Buttermere lies between the lakes of Buttermere and Crummock Water and has the summit of Grasmoor to the north. Buttermere lake is quite small, being just 1¼ miles long by a ¼ mile wide and 75 feet deep.

Buttermere is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

The civil parish of Buttermere, which extends for a considerable area around the village, had a population of 121 in the 2011 Census.

Caldecott Street

Town centre, off Hillmorton Road

1879

SP 512747

Thomas Caldecott (1798 - 1875)

Lord of the Manor of Rugby (1826 - 75); High Sheriff of the County of Warwick.

He gave a site in Church Street, Rugby and paid for the erection of St Andrews Girls School (later known as Trinity Schools) upon it.

The land upon which Caldecott Street and Temple Street were built, was purchased by The Rugby Freehold Land Society (their Rugby Estate #2) in 1868 from the executors of the late Count Wratislaw (1788-1853).

Callier Close

Cawston, off Calvestone Road

2004

SP 476739

Nellie Gurney-Callier (1876-1956)

Miss Gurney-Callier ran Cawston House Girls School at Cawston House from 1938 to 1956. (For more information aboutCawston House see Creswell Place.)

Prior to 1938 her school was based in Leamington Spa and known as Shrublands Hall Girls School.

Calvestone Road

Cawston, off Lawford Lane

2002

SP 478743

Cawston, near Rugby, Warwickshire.

Calvestone was the name by which Cawston was known in the Domesday Book survey of 1086.

As time passed, the name Calvestone became Causton or Cawston.

The name Calvestone probably meant “Kalf’s Farm”.

Cambridge Street

off Clifton Road

1878

SP 512752

The reason behind this street name is not known.

As Cambridge Street was built about the same time as Oxford Street, it is presumed that both streets were named after the famous University towns.

Most clergy of the established church at that time obtained their degree at either Cambridge or Oxford University.

In 745 Cambridge was referred to as Grontabricc, meaning ‘bridge on the River Granta’. The name change from Grant- to Cam- is due to Norman influence.

Campbell Street

New Bilton, off Lawford Road

1890s

SP 493753

James Archibald Campbell (1807 - 1879)

An experimental & scientific dairy farmer who owned Newland Farm in New Bilton. Also a prominent Rugby businessman and magistrate.

He was resident in Rugby from about 1850 until his decease. Apart from his farm, his interests included The Rugby Advertiser (proprietor and editor 1852 to 1860), the Rugby Hospital, the Workmen's Rest in Castle Street, the Warwickshire Scripture Readers Society and the Liberal Association.

Capulet Close

 

Bilton Woodlands Estate, off Cymbeline Way

 

1966

SP 490727

 

The Capulet family of Verona, Italy, in Romeo and Juliet

 

"Romeo and Juliet" is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare (1564-1616) about 1595. In it Juliet, a Capulet, is one of the two lovers whose death reconciles the Capulets with their sworn enemies the Montagues. (see also Montague Road.)

 

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names "having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare's birth" in 1564.

 

Carew Walk

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cunningham Way

1960s

SP 482744

Sir George Carew, (1504 - 45)

Admiral, RN (1545)

Died when the Mary Rose foundered.

Catesby Road

off Hillmorton Road

1935

SP 517744

Robert Catesby (c1572 - 1605)

He was one of the leading conspirators of the unsuccessful Gunpowder Plot of 1605.

He was the owner of Ashby St Ledgers Manor where much of the Gunpowder Plot was planned.

Cave Close

Cawston, off Trussell Way

2002

SP 470736

Margaret Cave

Margaret was the wife of Thomas Boughton (d. 1558)

Following the dissolution of the monasteries in 1538, Cawston was granted by King Henry VIII to Thomas Boughton (d. 1558) in 1545.

On his death, the estate passed to his eldest son, Thomas, and then two years later, on the death of the latter without issue, to his second son, Edward (d. 1589)

 

Cavendish Close

Cawston, off Whitefriars Drive

2004

SP 473742

William Cavendish (1552-1626), 1st Earl of Devonshire

In 1619 Cavendish married his second wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Edward Boughton (d. 1589) of Cawston. and widow of Sir Richard Wortley Kt.

Cavendish was the second son of Sir William Cavendish and Bess of Hardwick. He was ennobled as Baron Cavendish of Hardwick in 1605, and was made Earl of Devonshire in 1618. It reputedly cost him £10,900 to acquire this title.

Cawston Grange Drive

Cawston, off Coventry Road

2007

SP 474733

Cawston Grange, Warwickshire

The monks of Pipewell, a Cistercian abbey near Kettering in Northamptonshire possessed several granges in the vicinity of Dunchurch, with Cawston being the most valuable.

Following the dissolution of the monasteries in 1538, Cawston was granted by King Henry VIII to Thomas Boughton (d. 1558) in 1545.

His younger son, Edward (d. 1589), inherited the land in 1560 and built Cawston Hall on it about 1585.

Cawston Way

Bilton, off Magnet Lane

1918

SP 484736

Cawston Manor, Warwickshire.

Cawston adjoins Bilton to the SW. The Duke of Buccleuch’s family formerly owned much land there.

The name was suggested by the developers, the Rugby Provident Permanent Benefit Building Society. This Society has now merged with the Hinckley Building Society to become the Hinckley and Rugby Building Society.

Chapel Street

Town centre, off Market Place

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 503752

The Wesleyan (or Methodist) Chapel, which was erected in 1823.

The name ‘Chapel Street’ was introduced to describe the road that led from Swan Street to West Street (now Corporation street), following the erection in it of the original Methodist chapel in 1823. By the time of the 1861 census return, the former Swan Street was also known as Chapel Street.

In 1869 a new, enlarged, Methodist Church was opened in Market Place. The whole of their Chapel Street and the former chapel premises was then devoted for used by their day schools.

Charlesfield Road

Rokeby Estate, off Kingsway

1949

SP 501740

The reason behind this street name is uncertain.

As the names chosen for most of the roads on the Rokeby Estate have clear associations with the family of R H Wood who owned the land on which the roads were built, ‘Charlesfield’ probably also has a family connection.

It is a distinct possibility that the first part of the road’s name refers to Mr Wood’s great nephew, Captain Charles Edward Anderson, (1890 – 1916) who was killed in action in France during WW1.

Charles Warren Close

off Railway Terrace

1988

SP 507753

Charles George Warren (1900-1992)

The Borough Council decided to reward Charles Warren for a lifetime of service dedicated to the town and community.

The close was built approximately on the route of Pinders Lane when the area between James Street and Railway Terrace was redeveloped. (see also Pinders Lane.)

Charles Warren had been employed by the Council as a road sweeper for forty years. He also worked as a volunteer for the St Johns Ambulance for much of his life.

In the Rugby Advertiser dated August 20, 1987, Mr Warren said that he was delighted to have a street named after him.

Charlotte Street

off Railway Terrace

1868

SP 507753

Charlotte Anne Wratislaw, née Keele (1799 - 1863)

This street was developed by Charlotte's husband Count William Ferdinand Wratislaw (1788 - 1853) on land that he owned.

see also William Street

Charter Road

 

off Balcombe Road

 

1934

 

SP 520737

 

Rugby Borough Council

 

Charter Road was named to commemorate the town receiving its Charter of Incorporation as a Borough, having previously been an urban district.

 

Thomas Arnold Wise (see also Wise Grove) was made 'Charter Mayor' for the incorporation ceremony. The Royal Charter was presented to him by the Right Honourable Sir Austen Chamberlain MP on behalf of King George V.

Charwelton Drive

 

Brownsover, Avon Park, off Staveley Way

 

1993

SP 520770

 

Charwelton, Northamptonshire.

 

Charwelton is a village and civil parish about 5 miles south of Daventry. Its name is derived from the River Cherwell which runs through the village.

Charwelton Drive is one of a small group of roads in Brownsover that were named after a village in or near the south of Northamptonshire.

In the 2011 Census the civil parish had a population of 220.

Chaucer Road

Hillside, off Norton Leys

1964

 

SP 498728

Geoffrey Chaucer (c1340 – 1400)

Hw was an administrator who held many important royal posts. He is also one of the greatest english poets.

He was buried in Westminster Abbey and the part of the south transept where his memorial exists is now known as Poets Corner.

Today he is best known as the author of The Canterbury Tales.

Cheshire Close

Bilton, off Lawford Lane

1967

SP 482738

Leslie Jack Cheshire (1900-76) OBE

 

He was a mechanical engineer of some note. He joined the BTH in 1922, later moving to English Electric. He collaborated with Sir Frank Whittle in the development of the jet engine for aircraft for which he was awarded the OBE in June 1947.

He lived for many years in Church Walk, Bilton. He was chairman of the Rugby Liberal Association.

On his retirement in 1963, he moved away from Rugby.

Church Street

Town Centre, from Market Place

see Notes column

SP 503752

The parish church of St Andrew

The parish church has been situated in Church Street since the 12th century.

Church Street is one of the ancient streets of the town and is where Lawrence Sheriff founded the Grammar School that became Rugby School.

Church Walk

Town Centre, off Lawrence Sheriff Street

 

SP 505749

The parish church of St Andrew

This road/footpath leads to the parish church from Lawrence Sheriff Street.

Until 1891 the part of Church Walk that adjoined Lawrence Sheriff Street was named Church Road

Churchill Road

St Maries Estate, off Dunchurch Road

1958

SP 501745

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill KG, OM, CH, TD, PC, DL, FRS, RA (1874 – 1965)

He was a statesman who was British Prime Minister from 1940 to 1945 and from 1951 to 1955. During his time over fifty years as a British politician, in addition to being Prime Minister he held many other government offices.

Churchill was also an officer in the British Army, a historian, a writer and an artist. His writings included two biographies, three volumes of memoirs and several histories. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1953.

In 1920, Churchill rented School Field, the Rugby home of H C Bradby, for the six week polo season.

Claremont Road

off Clifton Road

1897

SP 511751

Possibly named after the Claremont mansion, near Esher, Surrey.

Claremont mansion was the residence of several distinguished people between 1708 & 1930.

Having initially been built only as far as Wells Street, Claremont Road was extended in 1905 to Craven Road.

At the time the road was built in Rugby, the mansion was the residence of Princess Helena, (1861 - 1922), the widow of Prince Leopold (1853 - 84), Duke of Albany, the fourth and youngest son of Queen Victoria.

Clarence Road

New Bilton, off Campbell Street

1899

SP 494754

Prince Albert Victor Christian Edward, Duke of Clarence and Avondale (1864 – 92)

He was the eldest son of King Edward VII, who he predeceased.

Duke of Clarence is a title which has been traditionally awarded to junior members of the English and British Royal families.

Clement Way

Cawston, off Turchill Road

2002

SP 472736

Ingelramus (or Ingelram) Clement

Ingelramus Clement, with his son William,  granted to the Abbey of Pipewell most of the land in Cawston that Clement had obtained, probably about 1150, from Siward de Ardern, the son of Turchil (see also Turchill Road).

The grant to Pipewell Abbey was confirmed by William before the Justices Itinerant at Northampton in 1171.

Clifton Road

off Church Street

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 506751

Clifton upon Dunsmore village

Part of the historic route from Rugby to Clifton. Apart from the Whitehall, the only building on Clifton Road to the east of Bath Street on the 1850 detailed map of Rugby parish was Bell’s Farm.

It became part of the Rugby and Harborough Turnpike (1801 - 78).

Collingwood Avenue

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Blackwood Avenue

1958

SP 487745

Cuthbert Collingwood, 1st Baron Collingwood, (1748 - 1810)

Vice-Admiral, RN (1805 - 1810)

Was second in command to Admiral Nelson at Trafalgar in 1805 in the Royal Sovereign.

Coniston Close

 

Brownsover, off Hawlands

 

1972

SP 515769

 

Coniston village and Coniston Water.

 

Coniston lies on the western shore of Coniston Water, about 6 miles to the south west of Ambleside. About two miles to the west of Coniston is Coniston Old Man, whose summit is 2,634 feet (803m) high.

 

Coniston Close is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Coniston Water is the third longest lake in the Lake District.

The population of Coniston at the 2011 Census was 928.

Conrad Close

Hillside, off Norton Leys

1972

SP 497729

Joseph Conrad (1857 – 1924) [formerly Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski]

Following a career in the merchant navy of France and later of Great Britain, he became a writer in English of novels and short stories that received both critical and popular acclaim.

He was born of Polish parents and became a British subject in 1886.

Constable Road

Lower Hillmorton, off Brindley Road

1966

SP 536741

John Constable RA (1776 – 1837)

 English Romantic painter.

He is known particularly for his landscape paintings of the area around Dedham Vale in Suffolk—now known as "Constable Country".

Cook Close

 

Brownsover, off Stonehills

 

1972

SP 512771

Joan Lily Cook, (1914-80)

 

Miss Cook started teaching during WW2 and continued until she retired about 1973. She was head of Northlands First School in Pinders Lane for the last 15 years of her career.

Cook Close is one of a small group of roads In Brownsover that were named after former head teachers in the Borough.

Miss Cook was born in Rugby and educated at the Rugby High School, Kings College and London University. In her later life she was a governor of several of Rugby’s schools.

In 1979 she married William H R Hartwell.

Copeland

 

Brownsover, off Hollowell Way

 

1977

SP 513773

 

Copeland Forest

 

Copeland is one of the ancient forests of the Lake District and is located to the north of Wast Water.

 

Copeland is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Copeland is now also the name of a parliamentary constituency. It was created in 1983 from the former constituency of Whitehaven and boundary changes in 2010 have since extended it eastwards to include the town of Keswick.

Corbett Street

 

off Hunter Street

1884

SP 514754

Archibald Cameron Corbett (1856 - 1933), 1st Baron Rowallan

The street was built by Thomas Hunter (1827-88) the founder of the Thomas Hunter Wagon Works in Mill Road, It was named after Corbett by Hunter who was a supporter of the Liberal Party.

Corbett unsuccessfully contested the bye-election in June 1884 for the seat of North Warwickshire as a Liberal. This constituency included Rugby.

Cordelia Way

 

Woodlands Estate, Bilton, off Cymbeline Way

1966

SP 492726

 

‘Cordelia'

 

Cordelia is King Lear's youngest and favourite daughter. "King Lear" is a tragedy that was written by William Shakespeare about 1605.

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names "having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare's birth" in 1564.

Cornwallis Road

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Frobisher Road

1961

SP 480743

Sir William Cornwallis GCB, (1744 - 1819)

Admiral, RN (1799 - 1806)

He commanded the Channel Fleet from 1801 to 1804.

Corporation Street

 

off Newbold Road

 

1957

 

SP 501755

 

see Reason column

 

This name was chosen by the Borough Council as "the road would be the first new road in the central part of the town for a considerable time".

 

West Street that was replaced by Corporation Street, marked the western limit of the built up part of the town until further developments took place in the 1830s.

There are no residential properties on this road.

Coton Road

Hillmorton, off Featherbed Lane

1961

SP 530739

John Coton

He was the Vicar of Hillmorton St John the Baptist from 1442 to 1447.

Coton Road is one of a small group of roads in Hillmorton that were named after former vicars of St John the Baptist.

Cotterell Road

 

Newbold on Avon, off Norman Road

1949

 

SP 496767

Elizabeth Cotterell (1828-97)

 

Elizabeth was the wife (m. 1853) of the Rev. Theodosius Boughton-Leigh, vicar of Newbold on Avon

Her father was Thomas Cotterell, who had been a High Sheriff of London and Middlesex. in 1851.

Coverley Place

New Bilton, off Pendred Road

1937

SP 492750

Sir Roger de Coverley

He was a fictional character in The Spectator, who exemplified the values of an old country gentleman, "rather beloved than esteemed".

See also Steele Street.

The Council felt that the road should be given a name associated with Addison because it was near to Addison Road. It is also the name of an English country dance.

Cowan Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cornwallis Road

1970

SP 480744

Sir Walter Henry Cowan KCB, (1871 - 1956)

Admiral, RN (1927 - 31).

Although long since retired from the Royal Navy, he saw action with the Commandos in WW2 at the age of seventy.

Craven Road

off Railway Terrace

c 1884

SP 508757

Presumably named after the Craven family, latterly the Earls of Craven.

Combe Abbey was the residence of the Craven family from 1622 to 1923. The road was initially named Craven Street

The Craven family held the patronage of St Andrew's Church, Rugby from 1767 to the 20th century.

Creswell Place

Cawston, off Whitefriars Drive

2005

SP 473742

Harry Bulkley Creswell FRIBA (1869-1960)

H B Creswell almost entirely rebuilt Cawston Lodge in 1907 for the 6th Duke of Buccleuch. It then became known as Cawston House.

During the early part of the 20th century, Creswell was one of the country’s foremost architects. Among his designs was the turbine factory that was built in 1901-06 for Willans & Robinson at Queensferry, Flintshire. He was also the author of a number of novels.

Cromwell Road

off Hillmorton Road

1905

SP 518747

Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658)

 

Cromwell, a Puritan, became the 1st Lord Protector of the Common-wealth of England, Scotland and Ireland (1653-58) following the Civil War.

 

It is said that non-conformists "who once were the main inhabitants of that part of the town" had their way in the naming of Cromwell Road. The road was laid out by the Rugby Freehold Land Society on Naseby's Field which they purchased in 1902. (see also Naseby Road.)

Culworth Close

 

Brownsover, Avon Park, off Charwelton Drive

 

1993

SP 521770

 

Culworth, Northamptonshire

 

Culworth is a village and civil parish about 7 miles north of Brackley and about 7 miles north east of Banbury.

 

Culworth Close is one of a small group of roads in Brownsover that were named after villages in or near South Northamptonshire.

In the 2011 Census the civil parish had a population of 445.

Cunningham Way

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Frobisher Road

1964

SP 482745

Andrew Browne Cunningham, 1st Viscount Cunningham of Hyndhope (1883 - 1963)

Admiral of the Fleet, RN (1943 - 1946)

Became 1st Sea Lord during WW2.

Curie Close

off Clifton Road

1995

SP 515752

Marie Skłodowska-Curie (1867 – 1934)

Polish physicist and chemist, famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity

Curie Close is on former site of Rugby High School for Girls, which named one of its school houses after her.

Cymbeline Way

 

Bilton, Woodlands Estate, off Longrood Road

 

1966

SP 496728

 

Cymbeline, King of Britain

 

Cymbeline was a play written by William Shakespeare. It is not known when he wrote it, but the first known production was in 1611.

In the play, King Cymbeline was the Celtic King of Britain in thrall to the Romans.

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names "having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare's birth" in 1564.

Dalkeith Avenue

Bilton, off Bawnmore Road

1912

SP 486735

Earl of Dalkeith

The eldest son and heir to the Duke of Buccleuch is given the courtesy title of Earl of Dalkeith.

The Dukes of Buccleuch and their family members owned much land in Dunchurch and Bilton in the 19th century.

The name was suggested by the developers, the Rugby Provident Permanent Benefit Building Society. This Society has now merged with the Hinckley Building Society to become the Hinckley and Rugby Building Society.

David Road

off Barton Road

1955

SP 490736

Dr Albert Augustus David (1867 - 1950)

Headmaster of Rugby School (1910 - 21) & Bishop of Liverpool (1923 - 44)

He was also a master at Rugby School (1892 - 99) and headmaster of Clifton School (1905 - 09). As headmaster of Rugby School his unorthodox views on teaching met with considerable opposition in some quarters.

Deane Road

Hillmorton, off Deerings Road

1955

SP 534739

The Right Rev Frederick Llewellyn Deane (1868 – 1952).

He was Bishop of Aberdeen and Orkney (1917 - 43). Whilst a teenager he had attended a private school in Rugby, from where he matriculated in 1887 at Keble College, Oxford.

His father, the Rev Francis Hugh Deane (1820 – 1904), had briefly been a curate at Hillmorton (1847- 49) and later was the Rector of South Kilworth, Leics (1887 – 1904).

Derwent Close

 

Brownsover, off Foxons Barn Road

 

1971

SP 513769

 

Derwent Water, Cumbria

 

Derwent Water is a lake in Borrowdale adjacent to the town of Keswick in the Lake District. The River Derwent flows through the lake.

Derwent Water is approximately 3 miles long by 1 mile wide and has a maximum depth of about 72 feet.

 

Derwent Close is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Alternatively it could have been named after the River Derwent in the Peak District, Derbyshire, as a small number of roads in Brownsover were named after places in this National Park. This River Derwent is about 50 miles long and flows into the River Trent, near to Derby.

Devonshire Close

Cawston, off Calvestone Road

2004

SP 477742

William Cavendish (1552-1626), 1st Earl of Devonshire

Cavendish’s second wife was Elizabeth, daughter of Edward Boughton (d. 1589) of Cawston and widow of Sir Richard Wortley. (see also Wortley Close)

Cavendish was made Earl of Devonshire in 1618. It reputedly cost him £10,900 to acquire this title.

(see also Cavendish Close.)

Dewar Grove

Hillmorton, Abbott's Farm Estate, off McKinnell Crescent

1965

SP 524750

William Dewar (1846 - 1917)

He was chairman of Rugby Urban District Council (1909 – 12).

He was also an assistant master at Rugby School from 1888 - 1911.

Dickens Road

Hillside, off Norton Leys

1964

SP 497730

Charles John Huffam Dickens (1812 -70)

Throughout his literary career Dickens wrote many novels whose success made him the most popular novelist of the 19th century.

He was buried in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

He wrote fifteen novels, most of which were the best-sellers of the day. They were serialized in weekly and monthly magazines before being published in standard book format. Amongst his many other writings were a large number of short stories including several Christmas-themed stories, and several non-fiction works.

Ditton Close

Bilton, off Nelson Way

1950

SP 482738

Thames Ditton, Surrey

Willans and Robinson, which was one of the businesses that amalgamated in 1918 to form English Electric, made high-speed reciprocating steam engines at their Ferry Works site at Thames Ditton, from the 1870s until they moved to Rugby in 1896.

The houses in Ditton Close were built to provide accommodation for English Electric employees.

Dovedale Close

 

Brownsover, off Hollowell Way

 

1975

 

SP 512773

 

Dovedale , Derbyshire

 

Dovedale is a valley in the Peak District that was cut by the River Dove through the surrounding limestone rock in the ice age. The valley runs for about 3 miles from Milldale in the north and a wooded ravine near Thorpe Cloud and Bunster Hill in the south and is about 3 miles north of Ashbourne, the nearest town.

Dovedale Close is a road in Brownsover that was named after a place in the Peak District National Park.

Dovedale is in the south of the National Park and is now one of the most visited natural tourist sites in Britain.

 

Drayton Leys

off Orson Leys

1973

SP 500731

The hamlet of Drayton within the parish of Daventry, Northants.

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose communities in Northamptonshire is not known.

Dreyer Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cornwallis Road.

1990s

SP 481748

Sir Frederic Charles Dreyer GBE, KCB (1878 - 1956)

Admiral, RN (1932 - 43)

His son, Sir Desmond Parry Dreyer (1910 – 2003), was also an admiral.

Drury Lane

off Warwick Street

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 504750

Drury Lane Theatre, London

It was a mediaeval lane. Previously known as Back Lane and then Tinkers Lane.

A troupe of players from the London theatre played there.

Dryden Place

New Bilton, off Steele Street

1935

SP 491751

John Dryden (1631 - 1700).

He was an English poet, literary critic and playwright who became Poet Laureate in 1688.

The Council felt that the road should be given a name associated with Addison's contemporaries because it was near to Addison Road.

He is buried in the Poets Corner of Westminster Abbey.

Duffy Place

 

Hillmorton, off High Street

 

1968

 

SP 532736

 

Thomas Leo Duffy (1906-73)

 

He joined the staff of the Rugby UDC in 1928 and became assistant town clerk in 1930.  He was then appointed as town clerk of Rugby Borough Council in 1954 until his retirement in 1966.

He was a native of Middlesborough and started his career in the town clerk's department in the county borough of Darlington. He was appointed as an honorary freeman of the Borough of Rugby, for his long and distinguished service to the town.

Dukes Jetty

Town Centre, off High Street

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 503751

Arthur Joseph Dukes (1887 - 1965)

Mayor of Rugby (1949 - 50).

This short passage or "jetty" is of ancient origin, but was not named until 1956.

The Dukes’ family for many years had an ironmongery and grocery business in Sheep Street, Rugby. In its early days the entrance to their residence was in the "jetty".

Duncan Drive

 

Bilton, Woodlands Estate, off Juliet Drive

 

1968

SP 486725

 

Duncan, King of Scotland

 

Duncan features in Macbeth a tragedy written about 1606.by William Shakespeare (1564-1616).

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names "having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare's birth" in 1564.

Dunchurch Road

off Warwick Street

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 502750

Dunchurch Village

This was the historic route between Rugby & Dunchurch, and known as the Dunchurch road.

Matthew Bloxam recalled that in 1813 there were no buldings in Dunchurch Road for upward of two miles, the area opposite the School playing fields being a corn field.

It probably started out as a bridle way. The first quarter mile between Warwick Street & Oak Street was known by the mid-Victorians as Dunchurch Street. It became part of the Rugby & Lutterworth Turnpike (1785 - 1878).

In the Domesday Book it was named as ‘Duneschirche’. The meaning of this old English name was probably “church of a man called Dun(n)”.

Dunnerdale

 

Brownsover, off Helvellyn Way

 

1982

SP 517773

 

Hall Dunnerdale, Cumbria

 

Hall Dunnerdale is a hamlet within the civil parish of Dunnerdale with Seathwaite which is spread along the Duddon valley of the Lake District. It is located about 6 miles north of Broughton in Furness and 34 miles west of Kendall.

Dunnerdale is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

In the 2011 Census the population of the civil parish of Dunnerdale with Seathwaite was 119.

Durrell Drive

Cawston, off Trussell Way

2002

SP 470734

George Darrell

George Darrell married Susanna Boughton, widow, (nee Brockett) at Newbold on Avon in 1591. She was the relict of Edward Boughton of Cawston (d. 1589).

Although George’s surname was spelt as ‘Darrell’ in the 1591 parish record of the marriage, spelling was inconsistent at that time and ‘Durrell’ as in the modern road name could have been an alternative spelling.

Dyson Close

Hillmorton, off Featherbed Lane

1965

SP 541742

Frank Dyson (1886 - 1969)

Having been elected to Rugby Rural District Council in 1919, he then became a member of the newly-formed Borough Council from 1932 to 1955. He was also Mayor of Rugby (1946-47).

He was also a builder and undertaker in Hillmorton.

Eastfield Place

Town Centre, off Little Church Street

Prior to 1841

SP 504751

Eastfield House

This street was known as New Street until 1935 when it was renamed to avoid confusion with the longer New Street in New Bilton.

‘Eastfield' appears in the 1871 census. Eastfield House became a preparatory school attached to the Arnold High School until its present use as the Masonic Hall.

The name New Street appears in the 1841 census returns for Rugby.

Eastlands Road

off Clifton Road

1927

SP 516753

Eastlands Farm

The road was built on part of the former farm.

It has not been established how the farm obtained its name.

East Union Street

Town centre, off Dunchurch Road

A map of 1849 names this road as Union Street.

SP 502748

The origin of this street name is not known.

The name of this street was recorded as East Union Street in the 1851 census return for Rugby.

It provided a connecting link between the southern end of Union Street and Dunchurch Road. It initially may have been part of Union Street.

Ecton Leys

off Fawsley Leys

1982

SP 503732

Ecton, a village east of Northampton.

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, used for grazing animals.

The village was known as Echentone in the Domesday Book, meaning “farmstead of a man called Ecca”.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Eden Road

Abbott’s Farm Estate, Hillmorton, off Vere Road

1957

SP 526743

Thomas Bainbridge Eden (1856 - 1944)

He was chairman of the Rugby UDC (1900 - 03)

He was the headmaster of Hillbrow Preparatory School (1889 – 1908) in Barby Road. He had previously been teaching at Orwell House Preparatory School, Clifton on Dunsmore.

Edwin Close

Cawston off Calvestone Road

2001

SP 475735

Edwin

The Domesday Book says that a man named ‘Edwin’ held Calvestone (Cawston) prior to 1066.

Edwin was a common name at this time and it is difficult to determine whether any of the other “Edwins” mentioned in the Warwickshire section of the Domesday Book was the holder of Cawston.

Edyvean Close

 

Bilton, off Bawnmore Road

 

1983

SP 491728

 

Norman Edyvean-Walker (1894-1974)

 

Edyvean Close was built on land off Dunchurch Road on which his house and garden were situated. The original field that his home was built upon was known as Spinney Close.

 

Until his retirement, Norman Edyvean-Walker was a solicitor in the family firm from 1913.He was also a non-executive director of Rugby Portland Cement Company. He became a deputy lieutenant of Warwickshire in 1952. He was made an honorary freeman of Rugby in 1969 in recognition of his many interests in the Borough which included the British Legion and St Cross Hospital.

Elborow Street

off Corporation Street

1835

SP 500751

Richard Elborowe jun (c1645 - 1707)

see also 'Biographies' section of this website.

Local benefactor & freeman of London who founded the Elborow charity school & almshouses in Rugby.

The site of this street was owned in the 17th cen. by Richard Elborowe and in the early 19th cen. by Dr R R Bloxam (1765-1840), an assistant master at Rugby School (1791-1827), who sold it for residential development.

Elsee Road

Town Centre, off Moultrie Road

1901

SP 507750

Charles Elsee MA (1830 - 1912)

Assistant Master, Rugby School (1860 - 1901); Chairman of Rugby UDC (1895 - 1900); County Councillor (1888 - 1910); County Alderman (1910 - 12).

He was a member of the Board of Management of the Hospital of St Cross from 1887, being its Chairman from 1893 to his death in 1912; he was also a Governor of the Lawrence Sheriff School. Elsee Road was built on Reynolds Field, part of the St Andrew’s glebe lands.

Elter Close

 

Brownsover, off Bow Fell

 

1974

SP 517771

 

Elter Water, Cumbria

 

Elter Water is a small lake about half a mile south east of the village of Elterwater. The river Brathay flows in an easterly direction from Elter Water to join Windermere near Ambleside.

Elter Close is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Elter Water has a maximum length of 1,030 yards and a maximum width of 350 yards. Its maximum depth is only 20 feet.

Ennerdale

 

Brownsover, off Grizedale

 

1975

SP 513773

 

Ennerdale Water, Cumbria

 

Ennerdale Water is the most westerly lake in the National Park and at about 2½ miles long, one of the smallest in the area. It is about eight miles to the east of Whitehaven and about a mile to the east of the small village of Ennerdale Bridge.

Ennerdale is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Ennerdale is fed by the river Liza, and flows out along the River Ehen to the sea near Sellafield.

 

Eskdale

 

Brownsover, off Borrowdale

 

1976

SP 512773

 

Eskdale, Cumbria

 

Eskdale is a glacial valley and civil parish in the western Lake District. The River Esk rises on Bow Fell mountain and runs through the valley to its estuary at Ravenglass

 

Eskdale is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

The Ravenglass and Eskdale Railway runs through the valley from Ravenglass to its eastern terminus at Dalegarth near Boot.

At the 2011 Census the population of the civil parish was 304.

Evans Road

Admirals Estate, Bilton, off Frobisher Road

1963

SP 482746

Edward Radcliffe Russell Garth Evans, 1st Baron Mountevans KCB DSO (1881 - 1957)

Admiral RN (1936 - 41)

He was in command of the Terra Nova the support ship that accompanied Scott's ill fated expedition of 1910-13 to the South Pole. He was in command of the destroyer HMS Broke in 1917 when it and the destroyer HMS Swift defeated 6 German destroyers in the Dover Straight. He later became Commander in Chief, The Nore, one of the Navy's major home commands  (1935 - 39)

Everest Road

Bilton, off Overslade Lane

 

1954

SP 493737

Mount Everest, the world's highest mountain at 29,035 feet.

 

Thus road was named to commemorate the first ascent of Mount Everest by Sir Edmund Hillary in June 1953. (see also Hillary Road.)

It is one of the many Himalayan high peaks in Nepal.

 

Evreux Way

Town Centre, off North Street

1966

SP 503754

Evreux, Normandy,  France

The Borough Council chose this name for the section of Newbold Road in front of the Town Hall that had become separated by a roundabout from the remainder during the construction of Corporation Street.

Rugby was twinned with Evreux in 1959.

Eydon Close

 

Brownsover, off Staveley Way

 

1993

SP 520768

 

Eydon, Northamptonshire

 

Eydon is a village and civil parish about 8 miles northeast of Banbury.

 

Eydon Close is one of a small group of roads in Brownsover that were named after a village in or near south Northamptonshire.

In the 2011 Census its population was 422.

Falstaff Drive

 

Bilton, Woodlands Estate, off Montague Road

 

1966

SP 489724

 

Sir John Falstaff

 

He is a fictional character who appears on stage in three of Shakespeare's plays, Henry IV Parts 1 and 2, and also in the Merry Wives of Windsor.

 

He is also referred to, without him making a stage appearance, in Henry V.

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names "having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare's birth" in 1564.

Faraday Road

 

off Pytchley Road

 

1932

SP 511741

 

Michael Faraday FRS (1791-1867)

 

Michael Faraday was an English chemist and physicist whose discoveries made significant contributions to the study of electromagnetism and electrochemistry. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1824.

The SI unit of capacitance, the farad, was named after him.

A plaque in his memory is in Westminster Abbey near to Isaac Newton's tomb. He is interred in Highgate Cemetery.

 

Fawsley Leys

off Long Furlong

1965

SP 500735

Fawsley, a ‘lost’ village near to Daventry, Northants.

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Fenwick Drive

off High Street, Hillmorton

1939

SP 534736

George Anthony Fenwick, (c1841 - 1912)

Fenwick Drive was built on site of his house, The Croft, High Street, Hillmorton.

He was a retired banker from Newcastle upon Tyne where he was born.

Ferndown Road (including Ferndown Terrace)

 

Bilton, Overslade Estate, off Hudson Road

 

1949

SP 490742

 

Ferndown Golf Club, near Bournemouth, Dorset.

 

These roads were named after a favourite golf course by the builder, David Mitchell and his associates.

 

Ferndown Golf Club was founded in 1912. It is considered to be one of the leading courses in the South West. It has hosted many important amateur and professional events including the Women's British Open in 1989.

Field View

Cawston, off Gold Avenue

2004

SP 476736

Cawston playing field.

Field View overlooks the public and Bilton School playing fields.

 

Finmere

 

Brownsover, off Staveley Way

 

1993

SP 520769

 

Finmere, Oxfordshire

 

Finmere is a village and civil parish south of the River Great Ouse. It is about 4 miles west of Buckingham in Buckinghamshire and about 4 miles east of Brackley in Northamptonshire.

Finmere is one of a small group of roads in Brownsover that was named after a village in or near south Northamptonshire. In the 2011 Census the population of the civil parish was 466.

 

Firs Drive

 

Town Centre, off Russelsheim Way.

 

1981

 

SP 500748

 

The Firs

 

This road name is derived from The Firs, a private house with a large garden, on which Firs Drive was built as part of the Gyratory System development.

For many years, The Firs was the home of the BTH Girls Club.

 

Fisher Avenue

Hillmorton Paddox, off Ashlawn Road

1928

SP 524735

Benjamin Holden Fisher (1822 - 89)

He was the first secretary (1866 - 89) of the Rugby Land Society, which developed this road.

His son William Thomas Fisher (1852 - 1927) succeeded him as secretary of the Society (1889 - 1926).

Fleet Crescent

 

Abbotts Farm Estate, off Loverock Crescent.

 

1955

SP 523745

 

John Thomas Fleet (1870-1953)

 

He had been a member of the UDC from 1921. When the UDC became a Borough in 1932, he was made an Alderman until his retirement from the Council in 1948. He was also a Mayor of Rugby (1934-35).

His occupation was as a chemist and druggist in Sheep Street.

 

Follager Road

off Gladstone Street

2005

SP 495757

Hugh Francis Fullagar (1872 – 1916)

He was a consulting engineer who patented a type of diesel engine. Willans and Robinson and its successor, English Electric, manufactured stationary engines to his basic design until the early 1950s.

The road was built on land formerly owned by Willans & Robinson and its successors. Rugby Borough Council admitted that they had mis-spelt the road name but said that it would be too disruptive to the residents to correct the road sign.

Fornside Close

 

Brownsover, off Dunnerdale

 

1984

SP 516774

 

Fornside, Cumbria

 

Fornside is a hamlet about 4 miles south east of Keswick. It is part of the civil parish of St John's Castlerigg and Wythburn.

Fornside Close is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

(see also Wythburn Way)

Fosterd Road

Newbold Glebe Estate, off Newbold Road

1950

SP 496766

Richard Fosterd

He bequeathed land & property in Frankton to provide an income for the maintenance of the Avon Bridge in Newbold Road.

An 1835 Parliamentary report of an enquiry into Charities states that the bequest was made by a Will bearing date 10th August 1508. Elsewhere the date is given as 1558.

Fox Close

 

Hillmorton, off Lower Street

 

1978

SP 536740

 

Leonard Braines Fox (1902-71)

 

Leonard Fox had been a Ratepayer councillor on Rugby Borough Council (1937-58). Uniquely for Rugby BC, he served two separated terms as Mayor (1951-52 & 1957-58).

His occupation had been a mechanical engineer.

 

Francis Drive

Cawston, off Stonehall Road

2001

SP 472740

Francis Boughton (1642-1707) of Cawston Hall.

Francis Boughton inherited the manor of Cawston from his uncle, William Boughton (1623-63), who died without issue.

 

When Francis died, also without issue, the manor passed to a kinsman, Edward Boughton of Church Lawford.

In his will, Francis Boughton bequeathed £400 to buy land and build a free school for the children of Dunchurch which continues to exist today (2017) as a voluntary aided Church school.

Franklin Close

 

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Nelson Way

 

 

SP 483539

 

John Franklin (1786-1847) KCH FRGS

 

Rear Admiral, RN.  He served in the Royal Navy from 1800 until his death in 1847. He was promoted posthumously in 1852 to Rear Admiral of the Blue because it had been presumed by the Admiralty that he was still alive.

 

Whilst in the Royal Navy he participated in several historic voyages and naval battles, including the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805 with HMS Bellerophon. He was knighted by George IV in 1829. He was Lieutenant-Governor of Van Diemen's Land (now Tasmania) from 1836 to 1843. In 1845 he was appointed commander of his third expedition to the Arctic.The expedition was unsuccessful and all the crew members perished whilst attmpting to chart and navigate a section of the Northwest.Passage.

Frederick Press Way

 

off Oliver Street

 

 

SP 498752

 

Frederick James Press (1909-64)

 

He was mamber of the Rugby Borough council from 1943, including being mayor in 1953-54 and becoming an alderman in 1961. He was also appointed as a JP for Warwickshire in 1952.

 

By profession he was an architect and surveyor. In this capacity he was responsible for laying out many of the estates in Hillmorton Paddox and Southlands as well as Hart Close. Among his other interests were the Rugby Theatre and the Old Murrayian Society.

Freemantle Road

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Blackwood Avenue

1959

SP 486745

Sir Thomas Francis Fremantle, GCB, (1765 - 1819)

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